Saturday, July 13, 2013

Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands 2009

Represents the wealth of the islands in its natural resources of land, air and sea. Near the shore stands a large limestone latte, the supporting column of ancient indigenous Chamorro structures. A canoe of the indigenous Carolinians represents the people's seafaring skills across vast distances. Two white fairy tern birds fly in characteristic synchrony overhead. A Carolinian mwar (head lei) composed of plumeria, langilang (Ylang Ylang), angagha (peacock flower) and teibwo (Pacific Basil) borders the bottom of the design near the inscription, NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS.

Saturday, June 29, 2013

U.S. Virgin Islands 2009

Features an outline of the three major islands, the yellow breast or banana quit, its official bird; the yellow cedar or yellow elder, the official flower; and a Tyre Palm Tree with the inscriptions, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS and United in Pride and Hope, the official motto of the territory.

Monday, June 24, 2013

District of Columbia 2009

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Features native son Duke Ellington, the internationally renowned composer and musician, seated at a grand piano with the inscriptions, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, DUKE ELLINGTON and JUSTICE FOR ALL, the District's motto.

Saturday, June 22, 2013

American Samoa 2009

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Depicts the ava bowl ("tanoa"), whisk and staff in the foreground with a coconut tree on the shore in the background and the inscriptions, AMERICAN SAMOA and SAMOA MUAMUA LE ATUA, the motto of American Samoa, which means "Samoa, God is First."





Thursday, July 12, 2012

Bust Half Dollars (1801 - 1839)


1806 Bust Half Dollar
The first half dollar was so-called “Flowing Hair” and featured the portrait of Liberty with stars alongside her on the obverse, and a small eagle surrounded by laurel branches on the reverse. After just two years, it was replaced by the “Draped Bust” design with Small Eagle Reverse minted only in 1796-1797. In 1801, Chief Engraver Robert Scot introduced the Bust Half dollar featuring a Heraldic Eagle on the reverse and Miss Liberty on obverse surrounded by 13 stars, representing the 13 original colonies. In 1807, the Draped Bust halves were replaced by the “Capped Bust, Lettered Edge (1807-1836)” Half Dollars – designed by John Reich. The obverse had Miss Liberty facing left instead of right and with curly hair tucked in a mobcap. Lettered Edge Capped Bust halves were issued until 1836, when they were replaced by the Capped Bust halves with a reeded edge. There are multiple major varieties of Bust Half dollars for almost every date. These varieties have captivated coin collectors for generations. In 1967, Al C. Overton spurred collectors' interest in Bust half dollars when he identified and codified over 500 die varieties and openly expressed his fascination for these beautiful coins in his book “Early Half Dollar Die Varieties 1794-1836.”

John Reich designed the reverse of the Capped Bust Half Dollar showing an eagle with outstretched wings as if it was getting ready to take off. On the obverse, besides wearing a drapery clasp, Liberty wore a headband with the inscription “LIBERTY” on it, just below her cap. Additionally, Chief Engraver Robert Scot reversed the positions of the arrows and olive branch held in the Eagle’s claws, putting the warlike arrows in the right claw and the peace symbol of the olive branch in the left claw. The inscription 50 C. appeared below the Eagle and the motto “E Pluribus Unum” was placed above the Eagle. In 1836, the Capped Bust halves with a reeded edge were issued. This new design was much like the older Capped Bust but showed some refinements: Liberty was slenderized, the motto on the reverse was removed, and the value sign of 50 C. was replaced with 50 CENTS in 1836 and HALF DOL. in 1837.

Buy Bust Half Dollars online from the Executive Coin Company, one of the top coin dealers in the United States. We offer a variety of Bust Half Dollars for sale in different grades: circulated, uncirculated, certified and graded by PCGS, NGC, and ANACS! Each coin is expertly photographed with color images of both obverse and reverse. Our half dollars selection includes the ever popular 1807 - 50 over 20 variety, and other sought out dates including: 1807, 1811, 1812, 1817, 1824, 1827 7 over 6, and 1837 Reverse 50 cents. Our inventory also includes the 1834 varieties with Large Date or Small Date, Large Letters Reverse or Small Letters Reverse. Each coin has been identified by Overton number. Please spend some time viewing our bust halves collection. We are hopeful you will find something you like. Purchase with confidence – your satisfaction is our ultimate goal.

Friday, July 6, 2012

History of the Seated Half Dollars (1839 - 1891)


1859 Seated Liberty Half Dollar
The Gobrecht Liberty Seated design, adopted first for silver dollars, was extended to half dollars in 1839. It was said that the half dollar was the only denomination that remained loyal to the Sully-Gobrecht design without drastically changing the original. The Seated Liberty Half Dollar underwent a couple of stages along the years. Thus we have five Varieties of this type: Variety 1 with No Motto, Variety 2 with Arrows and Rays, Variety 3 with Arrows and No Rays, Variety 4 with Motto, and Variety 5 with Arrows. All varieties show Miss Liberty on the obverse, sitting on a rock and holding a shield in her right hand. The shield displays the word LIBERTY on it. In her left hand, Liberty has a stick with a cap on top. Miss Liberty is surrounded by 13 stars, a theme reoccurring on many U.S. coins. On the reverse, a majestic eagle holds an olive branch and arrows in its claws. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is at the top and HALF DOL. at the bottom.The first obverse issues show no extra drapery at crook of elbow, while later issues until 1891 have a small patch below it. Because of the discover of gold in California and the shipment of silver coins to the West Indies and Latin America, survivors of early Seated Liberty halves are very scarce, especially in good condition. All dates in the Variety I No Motto are very rare, especially in high grades. That's why collectors of Seated Liberty Half Dollars might find it challenging to find the coins they seek for this denomination. For the first year of issue, mint-state survivors are extremely rare and proofs quite extinct.

Withing the first variety with No Motto above the eagle, there are different types: some first-year halves have small letters in legend (1839-1841), the 1840 came with medium letters, and starting 1841 the halves displayed large letters on the reverse. No reason has been found for the change to large letters. In 1853, the Mint lowered the weight of silver half dollars and issued the Seated Liberty with Arrows at the date and Rays around the eagle on the reverse. Only the Philadelphia and the New Orleans mints issued the new 1853 Seated Liberty halves. Then, in 1854, Mint Director James Ross Snowden ordered the engravers to issue quarters and half dollars with no rays around the eagle, but keep the arrows at the date (Variety 3 - Arrows, No Rays). It was thought that his decision was taken because adding rays somehow weakened working dies. He also tried to save additional costs.

From 1856 to 1866, the half dollars were issued with no rays and no arrows at date, resuming the Variety 1. With the Civil War dominating the country, many coins including half dollars were either buried in the ground or shipped overseas. That's why coins dating this period are rare, with 1866 S No Motto being the rarest of them, in all grades. Variety 4 Seated Liberty halves were first issued in 1866 after the approval of the Act of March 3, 1865 mandating the addition of the motto to all silver coins above the dime. Thus, the half dollar displayed the motto IN GOD WE TRUST, placed above the eagle on the reverse. The early 1873 halves show the 3 almost closed. Since it could have been mistaken for an 8, the Mint ordered new date logotypes with open 3. The changes affecting the Seated Liberty Half didn't stop here. Later in 1873, a new Mint Act mandated the addition of a distinguishing mark to identify coins at the new weights. For this reason arrows at date were added to the half dollars in 1873. So starting 1873 until 1874, the half dollar displayed both arrows at date and motto on the reverse. Again starting in 1875 until the end of this type, the seated liberty half dollar display no arrow at date - an arbitrary decision taken by the mint director to remove again the arrows.

Buy Seated Liberty Half Dollars in different grades and condition from the Executive Coin Company, one of the top coin dealers in United States. Our selection includes early date half dollars with Drapery and No Motto, examples of the variety with arrows at date and rays around the eagle, Seated half dollars with Motto and others. We also offer half dollars in high grades. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique coin collection! Check out our online selection below.

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Barber Quarter (1892 - 1916)


1914 Barber Quarter
The Barber Quarter was designed by Charles E. Barber - chief engraver of the Mint - who also designed the Barber Dime and the Barber Half Dollar. All three types of coins were released in the same year, 1892. The obverse theme of Miss Liberty is similar to that found on the dime and half dollar. Liberty is facing to the right, her hair in a cap, wearing a laurel wreath with LIBERTY on a small head band above her forehead. Liberty is surrounded by 6 stars to the left and 7 to the right. IN GOD WE TRUST is above and the date is below. Inspired by Robert Scot, the reverse is an adaptation of the Great Seal of the United States and depicts a heraldic eagle. The eagle holds an olive branch and arrows in its claws. He also displays a shield on its breast - the arms of the United States - and has a scroll in its beak inscribed E PLURIBUS UNUM. Above the eagle is a galaxy of 13 stars. The eagle is surrounded by UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the denomination. Barber's initial B appears at the truncation of Liberty's neck.

When it comes to collecting Barber Quarters, coin collectors especially look for the 2 varieties of reverse: Type I (1892 only) with the eagle's wing covering only half of E in UNITED; and Type II (1892-1916) with the wing covering most of E in UNITED and the other wing overlapping much of R in AMERICA. Type I coins are scarcer than Type II. Very Fine Barber Quarters are scarce, and Extremely Fine pieces are very rare. AU and Uncirculated pieces are scarcer yet and brilliant Uncirculated coins are very rare. Proofs of all date are available at a higher premium. The date the Barber Quarter collector looks for is the 1901-S quarter - a major 20th century rarity. The 1896-S and 1913-S are also key dates, and costly in any grade.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Barber Quarters for sale in different grades and condition. Our selection includes 1st Year Issue Barber quarters, the 1897-O key date, the 1913-S key date quarter and other popular Barber quarters in high grades. All quarters we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your coin collection!

Friday, June 22, 2012

Seated Liberty Dimes (1837 - 1891)


1886 Seated Liberty Dime
In 1837 the Seated Liberty was designed by Christian Gobrecht. A design that appeared first on silver dollars in 1836, it displayed Miss Liberty sitting on a rock and with a shield in front of her. In her right hand, Liberty was holding a scroll - or others would say a ribbon - with LIBERTY on it. With her left hand, Liberty was holding a pole with a liberty cap on top. For the reverse, Gobrecht put the denomination ONE DIME in the middle, surrounded by an olive branch with a bow. Just like the Seated Half Dime, this design underwent numerous changes along the years. The first Variety with No Stars on obverse was minted in 1837-1838. In 1838 through 1853, the Variety 2 with Stars on obverse was minted for circulation - 13 stars were added and surrounded Liberty. Starting 1838, Seated Liberty dimes were minted at the New Orleans mint, showing an O for the mint mark located above the bow on the reverse. The 1838-O Seated Liberty Dime is popular among coin collectors. Within Variety 2, Seated Liberty dimes were minted some with No Drapery from Elbow (1838-1840) and others With Drapery from Elbow (1840-1891).

After the gold rush in California and the rise in price of silver, the third Variety for Dimes emerged with Arrows at the Date (1853-1855) to denote the reduction of weight under the laws of the Act of February, 1853. Arrows at date were also placed on half dimes, quarters and half dollars during that period. Variety 3 dimes were minted at Philadelphia, New Orleans, San Francisco and Carson City mints. Just like the Seated half dimes, in 1860, the Seated Liberty dime design was changed again when mint designer James Longacre switched the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA from the reverse to the obverse, and placed a "Cereal Wreath" on the reverse, around the denomination. Among this Variety, the Carson City minted dimes are scarce and very popular with coin collectors. Dimes of 1873 and 1874 again appeared with arrowheads around the date, this time to signify a slight increase in the weight.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Seated Liberty Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date dimes like the 1805 Draped Bust dime and other early 1800s dimes in high grades. We also offer dimes in different varieties like the No Stars Liberty Seated dime and Seated dimes With Stars, as well as dimes with No Drapery, Arrows at Date, Obverse Stars and Legend on the obverse. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, June 15, 2012

Bust Quarters (1796 - 1838)



1834 Bust Dime
The first quarter introduced for circulation was the Draped Bust Quarter with Small Eagle Reverse in 1796. The design of Bust Quarter followed the patters of the early half-dimes and dimes. The 1796 Draped Bust featured 15 obverse stars and a flowing hair Liberty on the obverse. On the reverse, the small eagle was surrounded by an olive branch and the legend. As with the half-dimes, there is no denomination present on the quarters until 1804 when "25C." first appeared on the Draped Bust with Heraldic Eagle Reverse. The appearance of the eagle on the reverse was changed again in 1815 when the Capped Bust Quarter was released. 1796 Bust Quarters are very rare in any grade and usually at a high premium. The 1796 quarter is considered to be a key issue in any grade, and is a landmark in the American coinage series. The 1796 quarter is considered to be a key issue, and is a landmark in the American coinage series. Bust Quarters of 1804-1807 are very rare in high grades. Capped Bust quarter rarities are the 1832/2 and 1827 quarters.

Robert Scot's Draped Bust design appeared in 1796 on quarters, a type that had a Small Eagle Reverse in 1796 and a Heraldic Eagle Reverse for 1804-1807. Examples of Draped Bust dimes with Small Eagle Reverse are very rare especially in high grades. The Heraldic Eagle design displayed 13 stars on the obverse surrounding Liberty instead of 15. On the reverse, it had the Great Seal of the United States, known also to collectors as the Large Eagle. This eagle had a shield on its breast and holding in its beak a ribbon with E PLURIBUS UNUM inscribed on it. The eagle was holding arrows and an olive branch in its claws. Similar to the half dollar, the next design called "Capped Bust" showed Liberty with her hair tucked in a cap secured by a headband with the word LIBERTY on it. The reverse had a majestic eagle perched on a branch and holding arrows in its left claw. This time, the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was placed on a ribbon above the eagle and not in its beak like on earlier quarters. During the Capped Bust quarter period, there were two varieties minted: Variety 1 with Large Diameter and Variety 2 with Reduced Diameter. The Reduced Diameter variety (1831-1838) showed other changes too: restyled smaller letters, stars and numerals, giving the coin a more cameo-like appearance than its predecessor. The motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was removed from the reverse as well.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Bust Quarters in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date quarters like the 1806 Draped Bust quarter and other early 1800s quarters in high grades.  All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Monday, June 4, 2012

Barber Dime (1892 - 1916)


1913 Barber Dime
The Barber Dime was designed by Charles E. Barber - chief engraver of the Mint - who also designed the Barber Quarter and the Barber Half Dollar. All three types of coins were released in the same year - 1892. On the obverse, the Barber Dime features Miss Liberty facing right, with her hair in a large cap and wearing a laurel wreath, with the word LIBERTY in tiny letters in a band above her forehead. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds Liberty, while the date is below. The reverse features a large wreath enclosing the denomination ONE DIME. There was no room for the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on the coin, so it was omitted. When collecting Barber Dimes, collectors are looking for the very scarce 1894-S dime. Of only 24 minted (all as proofs), only a dozen are traced. After the ultra-rare 1894-S, the scarce 1895-O will be the date collector’s biggest challenge. The rest are common dates that are relatively easy to acquire in any desired grade from Good to AU. Brilliant Uncirculated coins are more difficult to find than the Uncirculated dimes. Proofs were minted each year from 1892 to 1915 for collectors, and these can be obtained with some searching.

The circumstances when the Barber Dime came to existence were unstable. Mint Director James Putnam Kimball stretched his authority to new limits when he irrationally condemned the 1878 Morgan dollar and the 1883 Liberty Head nickel as "illegal." He then convinced the Treasury to introduce a new bill to change coin designs only after current designed have been in use for 25 years. Since the Treasury announced that they have little money and time to give towards the new coin design, the situation was favorable for chief engraver Charles E. Barber, who took over the project to prepare the designs himself. According to historians, his design was simple and dull. His obverse design of the dime was a mirror image of the Morgan dollar head, with much of Liberty's hair cropped off and the rest concealed in a large cap. Furthermore, Barber left the reverse design as it had been since 1860, with a plain laurel wreath. Barber's initial B appeared at the truncation of Liberty's neck.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Barber Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes the popular 1895-O key date, the 1895-S, the 1901-S and 1903-S key dates dimes and other early date Barber Dimes. All Barber Dimes we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection!

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Liberty V Nickel (1883 - 1912)



1908 Liberty V Nickel
In 1883, the Shield Nickel was replaced by the Liberty V Nickel or "Liberty Head" nickel designed by Charles E. Barber, Engraver of the Mint. This type of nickel first appeared without the word CENTS on the reverse. Some of these first coins were gold plated and passed for $5. To discourage fraudulent practices, the word CENTS was added on the reverse at the bottom, later that year. Inspired by a Greco-Roman marble head and the Morgan Dollar design, Barber featured a profile of Liberty on the obverse wearing a crown with the inscription LIBERTY. Miss Liberty was surrounded by 13 stars. The reverse displayed the value of the coin in Roman numerals surrounded by a wreath of wheat, corn and cotton. The No Cents Liberty V nickels had the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM visible at the bottom on reverse, while the Liberty V nickels with Cents had the motto above the wreath. Key dates of the Liberty V Nickel series include the 1885, 1886 and 1912-S.

Collectors of this coin series look for a couple popular dates. The 1885 and 1886 Liberty V Nickels are sought out because the production for these dates was interrupted during 1885-1886, and there are limited quanities of nickels with these dates. The 1888-89 Liberty Nickels are very rare in brilliant proofs with mirror fields and frosty devices. Some later proofs are found more often cleaned than not. Many dates of proofs come stained or spotty - the result of the chemically active paper in which the Mint shipped proof coins. In 1912, for the first time in the history of this denomination, working dies for the nickels were sent to the Denver and San Francisco mints. That's why the 1912-S key date and the 1912-D Liberty V Nickels are popular among collectors.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Liberty Head nickels in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date 1883 No Cents Liberty V Nickels and 1883 With Cents Liberty V Nickels, and also key date Liberty V nickles such as the 1886 key date nickel and the 1912-S key date. All nickels we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! 

Saturday, May 12, 2012

Kennedy Half Dollar (1964 - present)

After the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963, the Mint started working on a design for the half dollar in the memory of the popular president. The coin was minted starting 1964. The obverse of the Kennedy Half Dollar was designed by Gilroy Roberts, chief engraver of the Mint, and it portrayed John F. Kennedy facing left, surrounded at the top by LIBERTY. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST was placed at the bottom, above the date. The reverse was designed by Frank Gasparro to display the president's coat of arms - an adaptation of the Great Seal of United States. The mintmark is located on the reverse below the olive branch in the eagle's right claw. The coins were very popular from the moment they were released in circulation. The Kennedy half was struck in silver only in 1964 and again from 1992 till present. The half dollar was also struck in silver clad and copper-nickel clad. Kennedy half dollar are also available in Uncirculated and Proof condition.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Kennedy Half Dollars and Kennedy Half Dollar Proof Rolls. All half dollars we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! Check out our online selection below.

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Roosevelt Dime (1946 - present)


1945 Roosevelt Dime
The Roosevelt Dime was designed by Jogn R. Sinnock in the memory of one of the most popular presidents of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt. Only a year after his death, Roosevelt got his portrait placed on the obverse of the U.S. dime. Around the left rim LIBERTY was inscribed. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST was placed at the bottom left of the coin, while the date is at the bottom right below Roosevelt's neck. The sate on the dime was designed in a more modernistic character with heavier lettering. On the reverse, Sinnock replaced the fasces with a torch surrounded by an olive branch and an oak branch, symbols of peace. Just like it happened with the Franklin Half Dollar designed by the same person, the Roosevelt Dime raised political controversy about the designer's initials JS on the obverse. Bigots started spreading rumors that the JS initials stood for the Communist leader Joseph Stalin and it was a disgrace to the United States Mint. All dates and mintmarks of Roosevelt dimes were issued in huge quantities. Therefore, collectors will have no difficulty to locate any date of this type, in any grades at a low premium.

The Roosevelt Dime was struck in silver until 1964. From 1965 on, they were made of copper-nickel bonded to inner core of pure copper. Therefore, there are two types of Roosevelt dimes: Type 1 Silver (1946-1964 and 1992-present) and Type 2 Clad (1965-present).

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Roosevelt Dimes in different grades and condition, certified and graded by PCGS. Our selection includes early date dimes with beautiful toning or mirror-like surfaces and full luster. We also offer Silver Roosevelt Dime Proof Rolls. All dimes we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Monday, April 30, 2012

Trade Dollar (1873 - 1885)


The Trade Dollar was designed by William Barber in 1873 and it was issued for circulation in the Orient to compete with other dollar-sized coins of other countries. It was intended for export only. In the United States though, they circulated as legal tenders until 1876 when the Congress withdrew them. Many pieces that circulated overseas were counterstamped with Oriental characters, known as chop marks. The production of dollars continued until 1878, and after that only tokens were issued for proof sets until 1885. IN 1887, the Treasury redeemed all Trade dollars that were not mutilated. On the obverse, the Trade dollars depicts Miss Liberty facing left and looking towards the seashore, sitting on a cotton bale and holding an olive branch in her right hand. To her back stands a sheaf of wheat. In her left hand, Liberty is holding a ribbon or scroll with the word LIBERTY on it. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST is placed toward the bottom of the obverse, just above the date. Liberty is surrounded by 13 stars. On the reverse, a majestic eagle is holding an olive branch and arrows in its claws. E PLURIBUS UNUM is above on a ribbon, while the inscription 420 GRAINS, 900 FINE is below, just above the denomination. The mintmark is located on the reverse above the D in DOLLAR. The rarest of Trade Dollars are those dated 1884 and 1885. Issued only as Proofs and in small quantities, the existence of these coins was not revealed until 1908. However, all Trade Dollars are considered rare in high grades and the ones available are usually at high premiums.

Along the years of production, the Trade Dollar underwent some changes definitely worth mentioning. For the obverse, Trade dollars of 1873 through 1876 had the scroll point with LIBERTY ending to the left and Liberty's extended hand displaying only three fingers. Then, from 1876 till 1885, the scroll point ended downward and Liberty's extended hand showed four fingers. For the reverse, from 1873 until 1874 and occasionally in 1875 and 1876, there was a berry under the eagle's left talon and one of the arrowheads ended over 0. Then, occasionally on coins dating 1875 and 1876 and on all coins from 1877 until 1885, the reverse had no extra berry under the eagle's talon and one of the arrowheads ended over 2.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Trade Dollars in different grades and condition, certified and graded by PCGS. Our selection includes early date dollars with or without chop marks. All Trade dollars we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, April 27, 2012

Jefferson Nickel (1938 - present)


The Jefferson Nickel was designed by Felix Schlag, whose creative design displaying the portrait of Thomas Jefferson on the obverse and a corner view of Jefferson’s home, Monticello, on the reverse won him an award of $1,000. The new nickels were first issued in 1938 and showed president Jefferson's bust facing left on the obverse and the front view of Monticello on the reverse. On the obverse the inscriptions were placed differently than on earlier U.S. coins - The motto IN GOD WE TRUST was placed around the left rim, while LIBERTY and the date was around the right rim. On the reverse, E PLURIBUS UNUM stood around the top rim, while the MONTICELLO, FIVE CENTS and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA were inscribed below the building.

Along the years of production, the Jefferson nickel underwent some changes, mostly in the details of Jefferson's hair and ribbon. However, collectors pay more attention to the reverse when it comes to details, especially looking at the steps of Monticello. "Full Steps" nickels command pretty high premiums. Beginning of 1942 until 1945, some Jefferson nickels were made of a different metallic composition and are known as "Wartime Silver Alloy" nickels - 35% silver, 56% copper, and 9% manganese. This change in composition was necessary during the war since nickel was a critical war material needed. A larger mintmark was placed above the dome of Monticello to distinguish them from regular nickels.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Jefferson Nickels in different grades and condition, certified and graded by PCGS. Our selection includes the 1939-D key date Jefferson nickel as well as Wartime Silver Alloy nickels. We also offer high grade nickels with Almost Full Steps and Jefferson Nickel Proof Rolls. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection at www.executivecoin.com

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Half Dimes (1794 - 1873)


The Half Dime was one of the first denominations introduced in the United States. After the Act of April 2, 1972 that authorized the issuance of silver 5 cents, the first Half Dimes were struck only in 1794 even thought the half dimes were in the making process since 1792. The first half dime introduced for circulating was the Flowing Hair (Bust) Half Dime, designed by Robert Scot. This design was used on all silver denominations of the time in an attempt to standardize their appearance. The concept of almost identical designs for coins with identical metal composition was used all through 19th century on circulation American coins. The 1802 Draped Bust, Heraldic Eagle half dime is one of the classic rarities in the U.S. coinage series and only very few pieces are known to exist. Proof coins began to be struck in 1860 at the Philadelphia Mint. Half dimes from 1863 to 1870 are all very rare to find.

The Flowing Hair Half Dime (1794 - 1795) displayed on the obverse a portrait of Liberty with flowing hair and facing right, surrounded by 15 stars. On the reverse, an eagle was perched on a cloud, surrounded by an olive branch and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. It seemed that this first design raised a lot of criticism from the people, who thought the representation of Liberty was horrible and the eagle looked more like a malnourished turkey. In 1796, this design was replaced by Scot's Draped Bust Half Dime, a type that had a Small Eagle Reverse in 1796 and 1797, similar to the eagle on the previous Bust design, and a Heraldic Eagle Reverse from 1800 to 1805. The Heraldic Eagle design displayed the Great Seal of the United States on the reverse, known also to collectors as the Large Eagle. In 1805, the production of Half Dimes ceased until 1829. The denomination appears for the first time on half dimes in 1829 on the reverse, when the Mint issued the Capped Bust half dime, a design that lasted until 1837. This time, Liberty was facing left and was surrounded by 13 stars instead of 15. The reverse had a majestic eagle holding an olive branch in its right claw and arrows in its left claw. The motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was introduced too, placed on a ribbon above the eagle.

In 1837, a new design was introduced for the half dime - the Seated Liberty designed by Christian Gobrecht. A design that appeared first on silver dollars in 1836, it displayed Miss Liberty sitting on a rock and with a shield in front of her. In her right hand, Liberty was holding a scroll - or others would say a ribbon - with LIBERTY on it. With her left hand, Liberty was holding a pole with a liberty cap on top. The reoccurring theme of Liberty surrounded by 13 stars is present as well. For the reverse, Gobrecht put the denomination HALF DIME in the middle, surrounded by an olive branch with a bow. This design underwent numerous changes along the years, many of them recorded as Varieties. The first Variety with No Stars on obverse was minted in 1837-1838. In 1838 through 1853, the Variety 2 with Stars on obverse was minted for circulation - 13 stars were added and surrounded Liberty. Starting 1838, Seated Liberty half dimes were minted at the New Orleans mint also, showing an O for the mintmark located above the bow on the reverse. The 1838-O Seated Half Dime is more easily available in low grades and far more rare in higher grades.

Within Variety 2, the half dimes were minted some with No Drapery from Elbow (1837-1840) and others With Drapery from Elbow (1840 on). In 1840, although initially guided to make some improvements in the Seated Liberty design, Robert Ball Hughes made some big changes on Liberty - he fattened her arms and body, enlarged her head, flattened her bosom, changed her decollete, chipped away much of the rock she sat on, moved her shield to an upright position, and changed her clothing, also adding extra drapery. This design appeared first on dollars, quarters and dimes. Even though these "improvements" were supposed to improve the striking quality and design, it seems that it actually weakened the strike in all denominations from 1840 till 1858. "Full Head" coins are very rare or unknown of for this period.

After the gold rush in California and the rise in price of silver, the third Variety for Half Dimes emerged with Arrows at the Date (1853-1855) to denote the reduction of weight under the laws of the Act of February, 1853. Arrows at date were also placed on dimes, quarters and halves during that period. Variety 3 half dimes were minted at Philadelphia, New Orleans and San Francisco mints. Since all half dimes from this period were given to circulation, there are very few in high grade. In 1860, the Seated Liberty design was changed again when mint designer James Longacre switched the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA from the reverse to the obverse, and placed a "Cereal Wreath" on the reverse, around the denomination.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Half Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date half dimes like the 1796 Draped Bust Half dime and other early 1800s half dimes in high grades. We also offer half dime in different varieties like the No Stars Liberty Seated half dime and Seated half dimes With Stars, as well as Half Dimes with No Drapery, Arrows at Date, Obverse Stars and Legend on the obverse. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, April 20, 2012


The Franklin Half Dollar was designed in 1947 by John R. Sinnock, only a few weeks before his death. His initials appear below Franklin's shoulder. The coin depicts the portrait of Benjamin Franklin on the obverse, enclosed by LIBERTY at the top and the motto IN GOD WE TRUST at the bottom. On the reverse, Sinnock placed the Liberty bell, with an eagle on its right and E PLURIBUS UNUM at its left. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is above, while the denomination is below.

Even before the Franklin coin reached circulation, the design was criticized by many. Some thought the coin was too plain compared to the Walking Liberty Half Dollar. Others had objections regarding the eagle being too small and having low relief. The latter concern was solved later when Proofs of 1959-1963 showed off a new reverse hub with the eagle in higher relief and only three feathers instead of four. Still other people had concerns about the plain crack in the bell which could've brought derogatory remarks to the United States coinage. And then there were the bigots, who misinterpreted Sinnock initials J.S. placed on the coin as designating Joseph Stalin and therefore communism.

Franklin Half Dollars have emerged with popularity in the recent years. Although the collector can fill out his collection with all kinds of different grades including brilliant Uncirculated, full strike Uncirculated pieces with full bell lines on the reverse and other details are much harder to find. Proofs were minted from 1950 through 1963, some with satin finish and others as brilliant proofs.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Franklin half dollars in different grades and condition. Our selection includes high grade Franklin halves with great toning or cameo devices as well as Proofs and the 1949-S Franklin Half key date. We also offer Franklin Half Dollar Silver Proof Rolls. All Franklin halves we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! Check out our online selection below.

Monday, April 16, 2012

Washington Quarter (1932 - present)


1939 Washington Quarter
The Washington Quarter was issued at the 200th anniversary of George Washington's birth in order to commemorate the 1st United States president. After high competition for the design, the new quarter was designed by John Flanagan, a New York sculptor. His initials can be found at the base of Washington's neck. As the Treasury required, the president's portrait had to be based on Houdon's bust (1785) preserved at Mount Vernon. Therefore, the obverse shows the head of George Washington, facing left. LIBERTY is above, IN GOD WE TRUST to the left, and the date below. On the reverse, Flanagan placed an eagle perched on a branch, a wreath below it, and E PLURIBUS UNUM above. Around the reverse rim, UNITED STATES ON AMERICA and QUARTER DOLLAR were inscribed. The mintmark is located on the reverse, below the wreath. Only after the first quarters of this type went into circulation, the Commission had strong objections regarding the design. It seems that the motto IN GOD WE TRUST was too light and wore easily, and so did the details on Washington hair and face. For this reason, quarter from 1932-1934 are harder to find in good condition and with strong details on obverse. During 1934, two hub changes were made, producing medium and heavy motto types for the Philadelphia and Denver quarters. Quarters of 1935 have medium motto, while the ones dating 1936-1964 have heavy motto. The Washington quarter was minted in silver until 1964, when it was replaced with a new alloy.

Besides the modifications to the motto, other changes affected the Washington quarter along the years. In 1938, the president's profile was sharpened. In 1944, the shape of Washington's hair and ribbon were changed. Although there are no real rarities of Washington quarters, the collector of this type will definitely look for the 1932-S key date, available at a higher price than the rest of the quarters. The good thing about collecting Washington quarters is that the collector can fulfill his collection at a reasonable price. Later dates are available at low costs in any condition. The collector also has the option to seek out Washington quarters in high grades, at a good price, and with an array of superb toning or bright white with full luster. Proofs are available for the years 1936 through 1942 and 1950 through 1964.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Washington Quarters in different grades and condition, certified and graded by NGC and PCGS. Our selection includes the 1932-S key date Washington quarter as well as early date quarters in high grades. We offer beautifully toned quarters, bright white examples, and quarters with full luster. You can also browse through our Proof selection of Washington Quarters and the Quarter Proof Rolls. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, April 13, 2012

Bust Dimes (1796 - 1837)


1829 capped bust dime
The first dime introduced for circulation was the Draped Bust Dime with Small Eagle Reverse in 1796. The design of Early Bust Dimes coincides with the Bust Half Dimes. The 1796 Draped Bust features 13 obverse stars, while the 1797 dimes have 13 or 16 obverse stars. Just like the half dimes, early dimes have no denomination present on the reverse until 1809, when the denomination first appeared on the Capped Bust design. The Draped Bust, Heraldic Eagle dimes are usually found in low grades; high grades early dimes are rare.

Robert Scot's Draped Bust design appeared in 1796 on dimes, a type that had a Small Eagle Reverse for 1796-1797 and a Heraldic Eagle Reverse for 1798-1807. Examples of Draped Bust dimes with Small Eagle Reverse are very rare especially in high grades. The Heraldic Eagle design displayed the Great Seal of the United States on the reverse, known also to collectors as the Large Eagle. This eagle had a shield on its breast and holding in its beak a ribbon with E PLURIBUS UNUM inscribed on it. The eagle was holding arrows and an olive branch in its claws. The obverse depicted Liberty with flowing hair, a ribbon behind her head, and drapery covering her neckline. LIBERTY was placed above and the date below.The denomination - 10 C. - appears for the first time on dimes in 1809 on the reverse, when the Mint issued the Capped Bust dimes, a design that lasted until 1837. This time, Liberty was facing left and was surrounded by 13 stars. Similar to the half dollar design, Liberty had her hair tucked in a cap secured by a headband with the word LIBERTY on it. The reverse had a majestic eagle perched on a branch and holding arrows in its left claw. This time, the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was placed on a ribbon above the eagle and not in its beak like on earlier dimes.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Bust Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date dimes like the 1805 Draped Bust dime and other early 1800s dimes in high grades. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Peace Dollar (1921 - 1935)


Initially a commemorative coin to honor the peace of World War I, the Peace Dollar was designed by Anthony de Francisci in 1921. His monogram is located in the coin's field under the neck of Liberty. On the obverse, the Peace dollar depicts Miss Liberty facing left, wearing a crown similar to that seen on the Statue of Liberty. LIBERTY is above, while IN GOD WE TRUST and the date are below. The reverse portrays an eagle standing bold atop of a mountain peak, along with a laurel branch and PEACE inscribed below. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM are above, while ONE DOLLAR is to be seen just below the center. Rays of an unseen sun emanate from the lower right.

The existence of the Peace dollar is credited to Farran Zerbe, a coin collector with enough political influence to get the approval on releasing a coin to commemorate the peace of World War I. Zerbe was also a late historian of the American Numismatic Association. The Peace Dollar was put into circulation in January 1922, even though over 1 million pieces had been struck in December 1921. Issues of 1921, and a few pieces dated 1922, were in high relief. It was found that the high relief caused problems in having the pieces strike up properly, so in 1922 the motifs were redone to a shallower format. The rare Matte and Satin Finish Proofs of 1922 are of both the high-relief style of 1921 and the normal or shallow relief style.

Mintage of Peace silver dollars was continuous from 1921 through 1928 and again in 1934 and 1935. In 1964, the Denver Mint struck 316,076 Peace Dollars but, before they were released into circulation, all of the coins were destroyed. A few may have been purchased or "taken" by Mint employees and rumors persist of this coin's existence. However, for fear of confiscation by Treasury officials, none have yet appeared on the market. Were it legal to own, the 1964-D Peace Dollar would become one of the most valuable of all United States coins.

When it comes to collecting Peace dollars, the 1928-P is a key date, commanding a good price even in well-circulated grades. Most of the San Francisco issues are tough in uncirculated grades, particularly the 1927-S and 1928-S as well as the 1924-S and 1934-S.

The Executive Coin Company offers a wide selection of Peace Dollars including the rare key date 1921 Peace Dollar. Our selection consists of Peace Dollars uncertified or certified by PCGS, NGC and ANACS. We offer high grade Peace Dollars including certified MS67, 1928-P key date peace dollars and the sought out 1934-S. If you're looking for an original peace dollar with Superb Eye Appeal, Full Luster and Strike, Blast White surfaces, Original Skin, or Toning, we have it. Please check out our inventory below. We are confident you will find a Peace Dollar perfect for your unique collection.