Thursday, July 12, 2012

Bust Half Dollars (1801 - 1839)


1806 Bust Half Dollar
The first half dollar was so-called “Flowing Hair” and featured the portrait of Liberty with stars alongside her on the obverse, and a small eagle surrounded by laurel branches on the reverse. After just two years, it was replaced by the “Draped Bust” design with Small Eagle Reverse minted only in 1796-1797. In 1801, Chief Engraver Robert Scot introduced the Bust Half dollar featuring a Heraldic Eagle on the reverse and Miss Liberty on obverse surrounded by 13 stars, representing the 13 original colonies. In 1807, the Draped Bust halves were replaced by the “Capped Bust, Lettered Edge (1807-1836)” Half Dollars – designed by John Reich. The obverse had Miss Liberty facing left instead of right and with curly hair tucked in a mobcap. Lettered Edge Capped Bust halves were issued until 1836, when they were replaced by the Capped Bust halves with a reeded edge. There are multiple major varieties of Bust Half dollars for almost every date. These varieties have captivated coin collectors for generations. In 1967, Al C. Overton spurred collectors' interest in Bust half dollars when he identified and codified over 500 die varieties and openly expressed his fascination for these beautiful coins in his book “Early Half Dollar Die Varieties 1794-1836.”

John Reich designed the reverse of the Capped Bust Half Dollar showing an eagle with outstretched wings as if it was getting ready to take off. On the obverse, besides wearing a drapery clasp, Liberty wore a headband with the inscription “LIBERTY” on it, just below her cap. Additionally, Chief Engraver Robert Scot reversed the positions of the arrows and olive branch held in the Eagle’s claws, putting the warlike arrows in the right claw and the peace symbol of the olive branch in the left claw. The inscription 50 C. appeared below the Eagle and the motto “E Pluribus Unum” was placed above the Eagle. In 1836, the Capped Bust halves with a reeded edge were issued. This new design was much like the older Capped Bust but showed some refinements: Liberty was slenderized, the motto on the reverse was removed, and the value sign of 50 C. was replaced with 50 CENTS in 1836 and HALF DOL. in 1837.

Buy Bust Half Dollars online from the Executive Coin Company, one of the top coin dealers in the United States. We offer a variety of Bust Half Dollars for sale in different grades: circulated, uncirculated, certified and graded by PCGS, NGC, and ANACS! Each coin is expertly photographed with color images of both obverse and reverse. Our half dollars selection includes the ever popular 1807 - 50 over 20 variety, and other sought out dates including: 1807, 1811, 1812, 1817, 1824, 1827 7 over 6, and 1837 Reverse 50 cents. Our inventory also includes the 1834 varieties with Large Date or Small Date, Large Letters Reverse or Small Letters Reverse. Each coin has been identified by Overton number. Please spend some time viewing our bust halves collection. We are hopeful you will find something you like. Purchase with confidence – your satisfaction is our ultimate goal.

Friday, July 6, 2012

History of the Seated Half Dollars (1839 - 1891)


1859 Seated Liberty Half Dollar
The Gobrecht Liberty Seated design, adopted first for silver dollars, was extended to half dollars in 1839. It was said that the half dollar was the only denomination that remained loyal to the Sully-Gobrecht design without drastically changing the original. The Seated Liberty Half Dollar underwent a couple of stages along the years. Thus we have five Varieties of this type: Variety 1 with No Motto, Variety 2 with Arrows and Rays, Variety 3 with Arrows and No Rays, Variety 4 with Motto, and Variety 5 with Arrows. All varieties show Miss Liberty on the obverse, sitting on a rock and holding a shield in her right hand. The shield displays the word LIBERTY on it. In her left hand, Liberty has a stick with a cap on top. Miss Liberty is surrounded by 13 stars, a theme reoccurring on many U.S. coins. On the reverse, a majestic eagle holds an olive branch and arrows in its claws. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is at the top and HALF DOL. at the bottom.The first obverse issues show no extra drapery at crook of elbow, while later issues until 1891 have a small patch below it. Because of the discover of gold in California and the shipment of silver coins to the West Indies and Latin America, survivors of early Seated Liberty halves are very scarce, especially in good condition. All dates in the Variety I No Motto are very rare, especially in high grades. That's why collectors of Seated Liberty Half Dollars might find it challenging to find the coins they seek for this denomination. For the first year of issue, mint-state survivors are extremely rare and proofs quite extinct.

Withing the first variety with No Motto above the eagle, there are different types: some first-year halves have small letters in legend (1839-1841), the 1840 came with medium letters, and starting 1841 the halves displayed large letters on the reverse. No reason has been found for the change to large letters. In 1853, the Mint lowered the weight of silver half dollars and issued the Seated Liberty with Arrows at the date and Rays around the eagle on the reverse. Only the Philadelphia and the New Orleans mints issued the new 1853 Seated Liberty halves. Then, in 1854, Mint Director James Ross Snowden ordered the engravers to issue quarters and half dollars with no rays around the eagle, but keep the arrows at the date (Variety 3 - Arrows, No Rays). It was thought that his decision was taken because adding rays somehow weakened working dies. He also tried to save additional costs.

From 1856 to 1866, the half dollars were issued with no rays and no arrows at date, resuming the Variety 1. With the Civil War dominating the country, many coins including half dollars were either buried in the ground or shipped overseas. That's why coins dating this period are rare, with 1866 S No Motto being the rarest of them, in all grades. Variety 4 Seated Liberty halves were first issued in 1866 after the approval of the Act of March 3, 1865 mandating the addition of the motto to all silver coins above the dime. Thus, the half dollar displayed the motto IN GOD WE TRUST, placed above the eagle on the reverse. The early 1873 halves show the 3 almost closed. Since it could have been mistaken for an 8, the Mint ordered new date logotypes with open 3. The changes affecting the Seated Liberty Half didn't stop here. Later in 1873, a new Mint Act mandated the addition of a distinguishing mark to identify coins at the new weights. For this reason arrows at date were added to the half dollars in 1873. So starting 1873 until 1874, the half dollar displayed both arrows at date and motto on the reverse. Again starting in 1875 until the end of this type, the seated liberty half dollar display no arrow at date - an arbitrary decision taken by the mint director to remove again the arrows.

Buy Seated Liberty Half Dollars in different grades and condition from the Executive Coin Company, one of the top coin dealers in United States. Our selection includes early date half dollars with Drapery and No Motto, examples of the variety with arrows at date and rays around the eagle, Seated half dollars with Motto and others. We also offer half dollars in high grades. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique coin collection! Check out our online selection below.

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Barber Quarter (1892 - 1916)


1914 Barber Quarter
The Barber Quarter was designed by Charles E. Barber - chief engraver of the Mint - who also designed the Barber Dime and the Barber Half Dollar. All three types of coins were released in the same year, 1892. The obverse theme of Miss Liberty is similar to that found on the dime and half dollar. Liberty is facing to the right, her hair in a cap, wearing a laurel wreath with LIBERTY on a small head band above her forehead. Liberty is surrounded by 6 stars to the left and 7 to the right. IN GOD WE TRUST is above and the date is below. Inspired by Robert Scot, the reverse is an adaptation of the Great Seal of the United States and depicts a heraldic eagle. The eagle holds an olive branch and arrows in its claws. He also displays a shield on its breast - the arms of the United States - and has a scroll in its beak inscribed E PLURIBUS UNUM. Above the eagle is a galaxy of 13 stars. The eagle is surrounded by UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and the denomination. Barber's initial B appears at the truncation of Liberty's neck.

When it comes to collecting Barber Quarters, coin collectors especially look for the 2 varieties of reverse: Type I (1892 only) with the eagle's wing covering only half of E in UNITED; and Type II (1892-1916) with the wing covering most of E in UNITED and the other wing overlapping much of R in AMERICA. Type I coins are scarcer than Type II. Very Fine Barber Quarters are scarce, and Extremely Fine pieces are very rare. AU and Uncirculated pieces are scarcer yet and brilliant Uncirculated coins are very rare. Proofs of all date are available at a higher premium. The date the Barber Quarter collector looks for is the 1901-S quarter - a major 20th century rarity. The 1896-S and 1913-S are also key dates, and costly in any grade.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Barber Quarters for sale in different grades and condition. Our selection includes 1st Year Issue Barber quarters, the 1897-O key date, the 1913-S key date quarter and other popular Barber quarters in high grades. All quarters we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your coin collection!

Friday, June 22, 2012

Seated Liberty Dimes (1837 - 1891)


1886 Seated Liberty Dime
In 1837 the Seated Liberty was designed by Christian Gobrecht. A design that appeared first on silver dollars in 1836, it displayed Miss Liberty sitting on a rock and with a shield in front of her. In her right hand, Liberty was holding a scroll - or others would say a ribbon - with LIBERTY on it. With her left hand, Liberty was holding a pole with a liberty cap on top. For the reverse, Gobrecht put the denomination ONE DIME in the middle, surrounded by an olive branch with a bow. Just like the Seated Half Dime, this design underwent numerous changes along the years. The first Variety with No Stars on obverse was minted in 1837-1838. In 1838 through 1853, the Variety 2 with Stars on obverse was minted for circulation - 13 stars were added and surrounded Liberty. Starting 1838, Seated Liberty dimes were minted at the New Orleans mint, showing an O for the mint mark located above the bow on the reverse. The 1838-O Seated Liberty Dime is popular among coin collectors. Within Variety 2, Seated Liberty dimes were minted some with No Drapery from Elbow (1838-1840) and others With Drapery from Elbow (1840-1891).

After the gold rush in California and the rise in price of silver, the third Variety for Dimes emerged with Arrows at the Date (1853-1855) to denote the reduction of weight under the laws of the Act of February, 1853. Arrows at date were also placed on half dimes, quarters and half dollars during that period. Variety 3 dimes were minted at Philadelphia, New Orleans, San Francisco and Carson City mints. Just like the Seated half dimes, in 1860, the Seated Liberty dime design was changed again when mint designer James Longacre switched the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA from the reverse to the obverse, and placed a "Cereal Wreath" on the reverse, around the denomination. Among this Variety, the Carson City minted dimes are scarce and very popular with coin collectors. Dimes of 1873 and 1874 again appeared with arrowheads around the date, this time to signify a slight increase in the weight.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Seated Liberty Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date dimes like the 1805 Draped Bust dime and other early 1800s dimes in high grades. We also offer dimes in different varieties like the No Stars Liberty Seated dime and Seated dimes With Stars, as well as dimes with No Drapery, Arrows at Date, Obverse Stars and Legend on the obverse. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, June 15, 2012

Bust Quarters (1796 - 1838)



1834 Bust Dime
The first quarter introduced for circulation was the Draped Bust Quarter with Small Eagle Reverse in 1796. The design of Bust Quarter followed the patters of the early half-dimes and dimes. The 1796 Draped Bust featured 15 obverse stars and a flowing hair Liberty on the obverse. On the reverse, the small eagle was surrounded by an olive branch and the legend. As with the half-dimes, there is no denomination present on the quarters until 1804 when "25C." first appeared on the Draped Bust with Heraldic Eagle Reverse. The appearance of the eagle on the reverse was changed again in 1815 when the Capped Bust Quarter was released. 1796 Bust Quarters are very rare in any grade and usually at a high premium. The 1796 quarter is considered to be a key issue in any grade, and is a landmark in the American coinage series. The 1796 quarter is considered to be a key issue, and is a landmark in the American coinage series. Bust Quarters of 1804-1807 are very rare in high grades. Capped Bust quarter rarities are the 1832/2 and 1827 quarters.

Robert Scot's Draped Bust design appeared in 1796 on quarters, a type that had a Small Eagle Reverse in 1796 and a Heraldic Eagle Reverse for 1804-1807. Examples of Draped Bust dimes with Small Eagle Reverse are very rare especially in high grades. The Heraldic Eagle design displayed 13 stars on the obverse surrounding Liberty instead of 15. On the reverse, it had the Great Seal of the United States, known also to collectors as the Large Eagle. This eagle had a shield on its breast and holding in its beak a ribbon with E PLURIBUS UNUM inscribed on it. The eagle was holding arrows and an olive branch in its claws. Similar to the half dollar, the next design called "Capped Bust" showed Liberty with her hair tucked in a cap secured by a headband with the word LIBERTY on it. The reverse had a majestic eagle perched on a branch and holding arrows in its left claw. This time, the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was placed on a ribbon above the eagle and not in its beak like on earlier quarters. During the Capped Bust quarter period, there were two varieties minted: Variety 1 with Large Diameter and Variety 2 with Reduced Diameter. The Reduced Diameter variety (1831-1838) showed other changes too: restyled smaller letters, stars and numerals, giving the coin a more cameo-like appearance than its predecessor. The motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was removed from the reverse as well.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Bust Quarters in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date quarters like the 1806 Draped Bust quarter and other early 1800s quarters in high grades.  All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Monday, June 4, 2012

Barber Dime (1892 - 1916)


1913 Barber Dime
The Barber Dime was designed by Charles E. Barber - chief engraver of the Mint - who also designed the Barber Quarter and the Barber Half Dollar. All three types of coins were released in the same year - 1892. On the obverse, the Barber Dime features Miss Liberty facing right, with her hair in a large cap and wearing a laurel wreath, with the word LIBERTY in tiny letters in a band above her forehead. The inscription UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds Liberty, while the date is below. The reverse features a large wreath enclosing the denomination ONE DIME. There was no room for the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on the coin, so it was omitted. When collecting Barber Dimes, collectors are looking for the very scarce 1894-S dime. Of only 24 minted (all as proofs), only a dozen are traced. After the ultra-rare 1894-S, the scarce 1895-O will be the date collector’s biggest challenge. The rest are common dates that are relatively easy to acquire in any desired grade from Good to AU. Brilliant Uncirculated coins are more difficult to find than the Uncirculated dimes. Proofs were minted each year from 1892 to 1915 for collectors, and these can be obtained with some searching.

The circumstances when the Barber Dime came to existence were unstable. Mint Director James Putnam Kimball stretched his authority to new limits when he irrationally condemned the 1878 Morgan dollar and the 1883 Liberty Head nickel as "illegal." He then convinced the Treasury to introduce a new bill to change coin designs only after current designed have been in use for 25 years. Since the Treasury announced that they have little money and time to give towards the new coin design, the situation was favorable for chief engraver Charles E. Barber, who took over the project to prepare the designs himself. According to historians, his design was simple and dull. His obverse design of the dime was a mirror image of the Morgan dollar head, with much of Liberty's hair cropped off and the rest concealed in a large cap. Furthermore, Barber left the reverse design as it had been since 1860, with a plain laurel wreath. Barber's initial B appeared at the truncation of Liberty's neck.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Barber Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes the popular 1895-O key date, the 1895-S, the 1901-S and 1903-S key dates dimes and other early date Barber Dimes. All Barber Dimes we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection!

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Liberty V Nickel (1883 - 1912)



1908 Liberty V Nickel
In 1883, the Shield Nickel was replaced by the Liberty V Nickel or "Liberty Head" nickel designed by Charles E. Barber, Engraver of the Mint. This type of nickel first appeared without the word CENTS on the reverse. Some of these first coins were gold plated and passed for $5. To discourage fraudulent practices, the word CENTS was added on the reverse at the bottom, later that year. Inspired by a Greco-Roman marble head and the Morgan Dollar design, Barber featured a profile of Liberty on the obverse wearing a crown with the inscription LIBERTY. Miss Liberty was surrounded by 13 stars. The reverse displayed the value of the coin in Roman numerals surrounded by a wreath of wheat, corn and cotton. The No Cents Liberty V nickels had the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM visible at the bottom on reverse, while the Liberty V nickels with Cents had the motto above the wreath. Key dates of the Liberty V Nickel series include the 1885, 1886 and 1912-S.

Collectors of this coin series look for a couple popular dates. The 1885 and 1886 Liberty V Nickels are sought out because the production for these dates was interrupted during 1885-1886, and there are limited quanities of nickels with these dates. The 1888-89 Liberty Nickels are very rare in brilliant proofs with mirror fields and frosty devices. Some later proofs are found more often cleaned than not. Many dates of proofs come stained or spotty - the result of the chemically active paper in which the Mint shipped proof coins. In 1912, for the first time in the history of this denomination, working dies for the nickels were sent to the Denver and San Francisco mints. That's why the 1912-S key date and the 1912-D Liberty V Nickels are popular among collectors.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Liberty Head nickels in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date 1883 No Cents Liberty V Nickels and 1883 With Cents Liberty V Nickels, and also key date Liberty V nickles such as the 1886 key date nickel and the 1912-S key date. All nickels we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! 

Saturday, May 12, 2012

Kennedy Half Dollar (1964 - present)

After the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963, the Mint started working on a design for the half dollar in the memory of the popular president. The coin was minted starting 1964. The obverse of the Kennedy Half Dollar was designed by Gilroy Roberts, chief engraver of the Mint, and it portrayed John F. Kennedy facing left, surrounded at the top by LIBERTY. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST was placed at the bottom, above the date. The reverse was designed by Frank Gasparro to display the president's coat of arms - an adaptation of the Great Seal of United States. The mintmark is located on the reverse below the olive branch in the eagle's right claw. The coins were very popular from the moment they were released in circulation. The Kennedy half was struck in silver only in 1964 and again from 1992 till present. The half dollar was also struck in silver clad and copper-nickel clad. Kennedy half dollar are also available in Uncirculated and Proof condition.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Kennedy Half Dollars and Kennedy Half Dollar Proof Rolls. All half dollars we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! Check out our online selection below.

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Roosevelt Dime (1946 - present)


1945 Roosevelt Dime
The Roosevelt Dime was designed by Jogn R. Sinnock in the memory of one of the most popular presidents of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt. Only a year after his death, Roosevelt got his portrait placed on the obverse of the U.S. dime. Around the left rim LIBERTY was inscribed. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST was placed at the bottom left of the coin, while the date is at the bottom right below Roosevelt's neck. The sate on the dime was designed in a more modernistic character with heavier lettering. On the reverse, Sinnock replaced the fasces with a torch surrounded by an olive branch and an oak branch, symbols of peace. Just like it happened with the Franklin Half Dollar designed by the same person, the Roosevelt Dime raised political controversy about the designer's initials JS on the obverse. Bigots started spreading rumors that the JS initials stood for the Communist leader Joseph Stalin and it was a disgrace to the United States Mint. All dates and mintmarks of Roosevelt dimes were issued in huge quantities. Therefore, collectors will have no difficulty to locate any date of this type, in any grades at a low premium.

The Roosevelt Dime was struck in silver until 1964. From 1965 on, they were made of copper-nickel bonded to inner core of pure copper. Therefore, there are two types of Roosevelt dimes: Type 1 Silver (1946-1964 and 1992-present) and Type 2 Clad (1965-present).

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Roosevelt Dimes in different grades and condition, certified and graded by PCGS. Our selection includes early date dimes with beautiful toning or mirror-like surfaces and full luster. We also offer Silver Roosevelt Dime Proof Rolls. All dimes we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Monday, April 30, 2012

Trade Dollar (1873 - 1885)


The Trade Dollar was designed by William Barber in 1873 and it was issued for circulation in the Orient to compete with other dollar-sized coins of other countries. It was intended for export only. In the United States though, they circulated as legal tenders until 1876 when the Congress withdrew them. Many pieces that circulated overseas were counterstamped with Oriental characters, known as chop marks. The production of dollars continued until 1878, and after that only tokens were issued for proof sets until 1885. IN 1887, the Treasury redeemed all Trade dollars that were not mutilated. On the obverse, the Trade dollars depicts Miss Liberty facing left and looking towards the seashore, sitting on a cotton bale and holding an olive branch in her right hand. To her back stands a sheaf of wheat. In her left hand, Liberty is holding a ribbon or scroll with the word LIBERTY on it. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST is placed toward the bottom of the obverse, just above the date. Liberty is surrounded by 13 stars. On the reverse, a majestic eagle is holding an olive branch and arrows in its claws. E PLURIBUS UNUM is above on a ribbon, while the inscription 420 GRAINS, 900 FINE is below, just above the denomination. The mintmark is located on the reverse above the D in DOLLAR. The rarest of Trade Dollars are those dated 1884 and 1885. Issued only as Proofs and in small quantities, the existence of these coins was not revealed until 1908. However, all Trade Dollars are considered rare in high grades and the ones available are usually at high premiums.

Along the years of production, the Trade Dollar underwent some changes definitely worth mentioning. For the obverse, Trade dollars of 1873 through 1876 had the scroll point with LIBERTY ending to the left and Liberty's extended hand displaying only three fingers. Then, from 1876 till 1885, the scroll point ended downward and Liberty's extended hand showed four fingers. For the reverse, from 1873 until 1874 and occasionally in 1875 and 1876, there was a berry under the eagle's left talon and one of the arrowheads ended over 0. Then, occasionally on coins dating 1875 and 1876 and on all coins from 1877 until 1885, the reverse had no extra berry under the eagle's talon and one of the arrowheads ended over 2.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Trade Dollars in different grades and condition, certified and graded by PCGS. Our selection includes early date dollars with or without chop marks. All Trade dollars we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, April 27, 2012

Jefferson Nickel (1938 - present)


The Jefferson Nickel was designed by Felix Schlag, whose creative design displaying the portrait of Thomas Jefferson on the obverse and a corner view of Jefferson’s home, Monticello, on the reverse won him an award of $1,000. The new nickels were first issued in 1938 and showed president Jefferson's bust facing left on the obverse and the front view of Monticello on the reverse. On the obverse the inscriptions were placed differently than on earlier U.S. coins - The motto IN GOD WE TRUST was placed around the left rim, while LIBERTY and the date was around the right rim. On the reverse, E PLURIBUS UNUM stood around the top rim, while the MONTICELLO, FIVE CENTS and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA were inscribed below the building.

Along the years of production, the Jefferson nickel underwent some changes, mostly in the details of Jefferson's hair and ribbon. However, collectors pay more attention to the reverse when it comes to details, especially looking at the steps of Monticello. "Full Steps" nickels command pretty high premiums. Beginning of 1942 until 1945, some Jefferson nickels were made of a different metallic composition and are known as "Wartime Silver Alloy" nickels - 35% silver, 56% copper, and 9% manganese. This change in composition was necessary during the war since nickel was a critical war material needed. A larger mintmark was placed above the dome of Monticello to distinguish them from regular nickels.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Jefferson Nickels in different grades and condition, certified and graded by PCGS. Our selection includes the 1939-D key date Jefferson nickel as well as Wartime Silver Alloy nickels. We also offer high grade nickels with Almost Full Steps and Jefferson Nickel Proof Rolls. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection at www.executivecoin.com

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Half Dimes (1794 - 1873)


The Half Dime was one of the first denominations introduced in the United States. After the Act of April 2, 1972 that authorized the issuance of silver 5 cents, the first Half Dimes were struck only in 1794 even thought the half dimes were in the making process since 1792. The first half dime introduced for circulating was the Flowing Hair (Bust) Half Dime, designed by Robert Scot. This design was used on all silver denominations of the time in an attempt to standardize their appearance. The concept of almost identical designs for coins with identical metal composition was used all through 19th century on circulation American coins. The 1802 Draped Bust, Heraldic Eagle half dime is one of the classic rarities in the U.S. coinage series and only very few pieces are known to exist. Proof coins began to be struck in 1860 at the Philadelphia Mint. Half dimes from 1863 to 1870 are all very rare to find.

The Flowing Hair Half Dime (1794 - 1795) displayed on the obverse a portrait of Liberty with flowing hair and facing right, surrounded by 15 stars. On the reverse, an eagle was perched on a cloud, surrounded by an olive branch and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. It seemed that this first design raised a lot of criticism from the people, who thought the representation of Liberty was horrible and the eagle looked more like a malnourished turkey. In 1796, this design was replaced by Scot's Draped Bust Half Dime, a type that had a Small Eagle Reverse in 1796 and 1797, similar to the eagle on the previous Bust design, and a Heraldic Eagle Reverse from 1800 to 1805. The Heraldic Eagle design displayed the Great Seal of the United States on the reverse, known also to collectors as the Large Eagle. In 1805, the production of Half Dimes ceased until 1829. The denomination appears for the first time on half dimes in 1829 on the reverse, when the Mint issued the Capped Bust half dime, a design that lasted until 1837. This time, Liberty was facing left and was surrounded by 13 stars instead of 15. The reverse had a majestic eagle holding an olive branch in its right claw and arrows in its left claw. The motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was introduced too, placed on a ribbon above the eagle.

In 1837, a new design was introduced for the half dime - the Seated Liberty designed by Christian Gobrecht. A design that appeared first on silver dollars in 1836, it displayed Miss Liberty sitting on a rock and with a shield in front of her. In her right hand, Liberty was holding a scroll - or others would say a ribbon - with LIBERTY on it. With her left hand, Liberty was holding a pole with a liberty cap on top. The reoccurring theme of Liberty surrounded by 13 stars is present as well. For the reverse, Gobrecht put the denomination HALF DIME in the middle, surrounded by an olive branch with a bow. This design underwent numerous changes along the years, many of them recorded as Varieties. The first Variety with No Stars on obverse was minted in 1837-1838. In 1838 through 1853, the Variety 2 with Stars on obverse was minted for circulation - 13 stars were added and surrounded Liberty. Starting 1838, Seated Liberty half dimes were minted at the New Orleans mint also, showing an O for the mintmark located above the bow on the reverse. The 1838-O Seated Half Dime is more easily available in low grades and far more rare in higher grades.

Within Variety 2, the half dimes were minted some with No Drapery from Elbow (1837-1840) and others With Drapery from Elbow (1840 on). In 1840, although initially guided to make some improvements in the Seated Liberty design, Robert Ball Hughes made some big changes on Liberty - he fattened her arms and body, enlarged her head, flattened her bosom, changed her decollete, chipped away much of the rock she sat on, moved her shield to an upright position, and changed her clothing, also adding extra drapery. This design appeared first on dollars, quarters and dimes. Even though these "improvements" were supposed to improve the striking quality and design, it seems that it actually weakened the strike in all denominations from 1840 till 1858. "Full Head" coins are very rare or unknown of for this period.

After the gold rush in California and the rise in price of silver, the third Variety for Half Dimes emerged with Arrows at the Date (1853-1855) to denote the reduction of weight under the laws of the Act of February, 1853. Arrows at date were also placed on dimes, quarters and halves during that period. Variety 3 half dimes were minted at Philadelphia, New Orleans and San Francisco mints. Since all half dimes from this period were given to circulation, there are very few in high grade. In 1860, the Seated Liberty design was changed again when mint designer James Longacre switched the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA from the reverse to the obverse, and placed a "Cereal Wreath" on the reverse, around the denomination.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Half Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date half dimes like the 1796 Draped Bust Half dime and other early 1800s half dimes in high grades. We also offer half dime in different varieties like the No Stars Liberty Seated half dime and Seated half dimes With Stars, as well as Half Dimes with No Drapery, Arrows at Date, Obverse Stars and Legend on the obverse. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, April 20, 2012


The Franklin Half Dollar was designed in 1947 by John R. Sinnock, only a few weeks before his death. His initials appear below Franklin's shoulder. The coin depicts the portrait of Benjamin Franklin on the obverse, enclosed by LIBERTY at the top and the motto IN GOD WE TRUST at the bottom. On the reverse, Sinnock placed the Liberty bell, with an eagle on its right and E PLURIBUS UNUM at its left. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is above, while the denomination is below.

Even before the Franklin coin reached circulation, the design was criticized by many. Some thought the coin was too plain compared to the Walking Liberty Half Dollar. Others had objections regarding the eagle being too small and having low relief. The latter concern was solved later when Proofs of 1959-1963 showed off a new reverse hub with the eagle in higher relief and only three feathers instead of four. Still other people had concerns about the plain crack in the bell which could've brought derogatory remarks to the United States coinage. And then there were the bigots, who misinterpreted Sinnock initials J.S. placed on the coin as designating Joseph Stalin and therefore communism.

Franklin Half Dollars have emerged with popularity in the recent years. Although the collector can fill out his collection with all kinds of different grades including brilliant Uncirculated, full strike Uncirculated pieces with full bell lines on the reverse and other details are much harder to find. Proofs were minted from 1950 through 1963, some with satin finish and others as brilliant proofs.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Franklin half dollars in different grades and condition. Our selection includes high grade Franklin halves with great toning or cameo devices as well as Proofs and the 1949-S Franklin Half key date. We also offer Franklin Half Dollar Silver Proof Rolls. All Franklin halves we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! Check out our online selection below.

Monday, April 16, 2012

Washington Quarter (1932 - present)


1939 Washington Quarter
The Washington Quarter was issued at the 200th anniversary of George Washington's birth in order to commemorate the 1st United States president. After high competition for the design, the new quarter was designed by John Flanagan, a New York sculptor. His initials can be found at the base of Washington's neck. As the Treasury required, the president's portrait had to be based on Houdon's bust (1785) preserved at Mount Vernon. Therefore, the obverse shows the head of George Washington, facing left. LIBERTY is above, IN GOD WE TRUST to the left, and the date below. On the reverse, Flanagan placed an eagle perched on a branch, a wreath below it, and E PLURIBUS UNUM above. Around the reverse rim, UNITED STATES ON AMERICA and QUARTER DOLLAR were inscribed. The mintmark is located on the reverse, below the wreath. Only after the first quarters of this type went into circulation, the Commission had strong objections regarding the design. It seems that the motto IN GOD WE TRUST was too light and wore easily, and so did the details on Washington hair and face. For this reason, quarter from 1932-1934 are harder to find in good condition and with strong details on obverse. During 1934, two hub changes were made, producing medium and heavy motto types for the Philadelphia and Denver quarters. Quarters of 1935 have medium motto, while the ones dating 1936-1964 have heavy motto. The Washington quarter was minted in silver until 1964, when it was replaced with a new alloy.

Besides the modifications to the motto, other changes affected the Washington quarter along the years. In 1938, the president's profile was sharpened. In 1944, the shape of Washington's hair and ribbon were changed. Although there are no real rarities of Washington quarters, the collector of this type will definitely look for the 1932-S key date, available at a higher price than the rest of the quarters. The good thing about collecting Washington quarters is that the collector can fulfill his collection at a reasonable price. Later dates are available at low costs in any condition. The collector also has the option to seek out Washington quarters in high grades, at a good price, and with an array of superb toning or bright white with full luster. Proofs are available for the years 1936 through 1942 and 1950 through 1964.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Washington Quarters in different grades and condition, certified and graded by NGC and PCGS. Our selection includes the 1932-S key date Washington quarter as well as early date quarters in high grades. We offer beautifully toned quarters, bright white examples, and quarters with full luster. You can also browse through our Proof selection of Washington Quarters and the Quarter Proof Rolls. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, April 13, 2012

Bust Dimes (1796 - 1837)


1829 capped bust dime
The first dime introduced for circulation was the Draped Bust Dime with Small Eagle Reverse in 1796. The design of Early Bust Dimes coincides with the Bust Half Dimes. The 1796 Draped Bust features 13 obverse stars, while the 1797 dimes have 13 or 16 obverse stars. Just like the half dimes, early dimes have no denomination present on the reverse until 1809, when the denomination first appeared on the Capped Bust design. The Draped Bust, Heraldic Eagle dimes are usually found in low grades; high grades early dimes are rare.

Robert Scot's Draped Bust design appeared in 1796 on dimes, a type that had a Small Eagle Reverse for 1796-1797 and a Heraldic Eagle Reverse for 1798-1807. Examples of Draped Bust dimes with Small Eagle Reverse are very rare especially in high grades. The Heraldic Eagle design displayed the Great Seal of the United States on the reverse, known also to collectors as the Large Eagle. This eagle had a shield on its breast and holding in its beak a ribbon with E PLURIBUS UNUM inscribed on it. The eagle was holding arrows and an olive branch in its claws. The obverse depicted Liberty with flowing hair, a ribbon behind her head, and drapery covering her neckline. LIBERTY was placed above and the date below.The denomination - 10 C. - appears for the first time on dimes in 1809 on the reverse, when the Mint issued the Capped Bust dimes, a design that lasted until 1837. This time, Liberty was facing left and was surrounded by 13 stars. Similar to the half dollar design, Liberty had her hair tucked in a cap secured by a headband with the word LIBERTY on it. The reverse had a majestic eagle perched on a branch and holding arrows in its left claw. This time, the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was placed on a ribbon above the eagle and not in its beak like on earlier dimes.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Bust Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date dimes like the 1805 Draped Bust dime and other early 1800s dimes in high grades. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Peace Dollar (1921 - 1935)


Initially a commemorative coin to honor the peace of World War I, the Peace Dollar was designed by Anthony de Francisci in 1921. His monogram is located in the coin's field under the neck of Liberty. On the obverse, the Peace dollar depicts Miss Liberty facing left, wearing a crown similar to that seen on the Statue of Liberty. LIBERTY is above, while IN GOD WE TRUST and the date are below. The reverse portrays an eagle standing bold atop of a mountain peak, along with a laurel branch and PEACE inscribed below. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM are above, while ONE DOLLAR is to be seen just below the center. Rays of an unseen sun emanate from the lower right.

The existence of the Peace dollar is credited to Farran Zerbe, a coin collector with enough political influence to get the approval on releasing a coin to commemorate the peace of World War I. Zerbe was also a late historian of the American Numismatic Association. The Peace Dollar was put into circulation in January 1922, even though over 1 million pieces had been struck in December 1921. Issues of 1921, and a few pieces dated 1922, were in high relief. It was found that the high relief caused problems in having the pieces strike up properly, so in 1922 the motifs were redone to a shallower format. The rare Matte and Satin Finish Proofs of 1922 are of both the high-relief style of 1921 and the normal or shallow relief style.

Mintage of Peace silver dollars was continuous from 1921 through 1928 and again in 1934 and 1935. In 1964, the Denver Mint struck 316,076 Peace Dollars but, before they were released into circulation, all of the coins were destroyed. A few may have been purchased or "taken" by Mint employees and rumors persist of this coin's existence. However, for fear of confiscation by Treasury officials, none have yet appeared on the market. Were it legal to own, the 1964-D Peace Dollar would become one of the most valuable of all United States coins.

When it comes to collecting Peace dollars, the 1928-P is a key date, commanding a good price even in well-circulated grades. Most of the San Francisco issues are tough in uncirculated grades, particularly the 1927-S and 1928-S as well as the 1924-S and 1934-S.

The Executive Coin Company offers a wide selection of Peace Dollars including the rare key date 1921 Peace Dollar. Our selection consists of Peace Dollars uncertified or certified by PCGS, NGC and ANACS. We offer high grade Peace Dollars including certified MS67, 1928-P key date peace dollars and the sought out 1934-S. If you're looking for an original peace dollar with Superb Eye Appeal, Full Luster and Strike, Blast White surfaces, Original Skin, or Toning, we have it. Please check out our inventory below. We are confident you will find a Peace Dollar perfect for your unique collection.

Friday, April 6, 2012

Buffalo Nickels (1913 - 1938)


1935 Buffalo Nickel
The Buffalo Nickel is distinctive in its own way, considered by collectors a truly unique American work of art. The coin portrays the American Indian on the obverse and the Buffalo or Bison on the reverse. Its designer, James E. Fraser, accurately portrayed the male Native American on the obverse and an American buffalo on the reverse by using three different Indians and a real bison from New York Central Park Zoo as models. His initial “F” is placed beneath the date. The 1st Year of Issue featured two distinct varieties: the 1913 Type 1 Buffalo Nickel had the bison on a mound, while the 1913 Type 2 Buffalo had a redesigned base with a thinner, straight line. Over 1.2 billion Buffalo nickels were minted from 1913 to 1938 at three mints: Philadelphia (no mintmark), San Francisco (S) and Denver (D). The mintmarks can be found on the reverse under the denomination. Matte Proof coins were made for collectors from 1913 to 1916. Proof Buffalo nickels began to be issued again in 1936. The 1937-D three-legged Buffalo nickel is another sought out 5 cent. The three-legged characteristic is the result of excessive regrinding of a die to remove clash marks.

Here's how the Buffalo Nickel came to existence. Early in 1911, aware of the law stipulating a coin design could be changed only as often as every 25 years, Treasury Secretary Franklin MacVeagh's son informed his father about the one-in-a-lifetime opportunity to release the new design on the five-cent piece. Thus, MacVeagh decided to take the occasion and produce something as magnificent as the Saint-Gaudens double eagle. For this, he hired James Earle Fraser, a former assistant to Saint-Gaudens and an exquisite artist to design the new nickel.

For the design, Fraser employed three chiefs as models for the obverse: Iron Tail, Two Moons and Chief John Big Tree. This way, he wanted to accurately portray the male Native American. To be consistent with the American theme, Fraser illustrated an American bison on the reverse, old Black Diamond, then living in a New York City zoo. He placed the buffalo on a mound to show its strength and majesty. Secretary MacVeagh loved Fraser’s design which was medal-like and beautiful, and he immediately approved the design for the five-cent coin. Therefore, by mid February 1913, despite strong opposition from the Hobbs Company of New York - a vending-machine firm - coinage began at the Philadelphia mint.

The Buffalo nickel underwent some changes along the years. First, Chief engraver Charles E. Barber removed the mound on the reverse, since the words "FIVE CENTS" at the base of the reverse wore down too quickly in circulation. Instead, he drew a line and put the denomination under it. Thus, in 1913, two distinct varieties were struck. The 1913 Type 1 Buffalo had the denomination on a raised mound on the reverse, while the 1913 Type 2 Buffalo had it set under a line. Since the public saved the very first coins released, it's harder to find the 1913-S Type 2 and it commands a higher premium. Secondly, Charles E. Barber made some changes on the obverse in 1916, lowering the relief of the Indian head and strengthening several details such as the nose and the lettering of LIBERTY.

Coin collecting started to be popular around 1940s and continued in 1950s, since most collectors could fill their coin boards by searching through pocket change or bank rolls. At that time, the most popular coins to collect were the Lincoln Cent, the Buffalo Nickel and the Mercury Dime. The later years saw a stagnation or even downfall in collecting Buffaloes, as the coins were less available and collectors had to buy individual coins from dealers or search through bags sold at a premium.

Besides the two popular varieties of 1913, collectors like the 1918/17 overdate from the Denver mint, matte proof and proof nickels, and the popular 1937-D three-legged Buffalo Nickel. During the 1920s and the World War I impact, the demand for all coins decreased. Thus, no Buffalo Nickel was made in 1922, 1932 and 1933. By end of 1937, it was decided that the 1938 Buffalo Nickel should be struck only at Denver. At least three reverse dies already with S mintmark were then overpunched with a "D."

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Buffalo Nickels in different grades: circulated, uncirculated, certified and graded by PCGS and NGC. Our selection includes the popular 1913-P and 1913-S Type 1 buffalo, 1913 Type 2 buffalo, key dates and scarce dates nickels like the 1915-D and the 1924-S, the sought out 1937-D 3-legged Buffalo, and others. All coins we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection!

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Half Cents (1800 - 1857)


Half Cent
The Half Cent is the lowest face value coin struck by the United States. All half cents are scarce and its popularity has grown in the past years. All half cents were issued at the Philadelphia Mint. The Draped Bust design of Robert Scot first appeared on Large Cents in 1796, then appeared on Half Cents in 1800. The first coins of 1800, and all of 1802, were struck on cent stock: blanks rolled and cut down from misstruck cents. On the obverse, the Half Cent portrays Liberty facing right, with flowing hair and wearing a ribbon in her hair. The inscription LIBERTY is above, while is date is below. On the reverse, the denomination HALF CENT is surrounded by a wreath and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Half cents of 1809 sported a new look, with a matronly bust of Liberty facing left and a modified wreath on the reverse. The new design, by John Reich, lasted until 1836 and was called "Classic Head." Classic Head half cents were not minted from 1812-1824, in 1827 and 1830. This design featured Liberty with flowing hair and wearing a headband with the inscription LIBERTY. She was surrounded by 6 stars on the right and 7 on the left.
The Braided Hair Half Cent was designed in 1840 by Christian Gobrecht and had Miss Liberty facing left this time, wearing her hair braided and being surrounded by 13 stars. Her headband bearing the inscription LIBERTY looked more like a crown. The Braided Hair half cents boast some of the lowest mintages of any U.S. coin types. Some collectors, especially those who have an affinity for this denomination, believe they are among the best values, as well. Full Red examples are very scarce. 1852 Half Cents are known only in proof condition and the so-called "Originals" of this date are extremely rare. Most originals have large berries in the wreath on reverse, while most restrikes have small berries in the wreath.

Collecting Half Cents has grown in popularity in the past years. Fortunately for collectors, the inaugural year of the Draped Bust (1800) is a reasonably common date. The 1802, the first overdate of any half cent, is the rarest date of the type and includes one variety with a new reverse (scarce) and another with the old reverse of 1800 (extremely scarce). Collectors are also interested in the different varieties of the Draped Bust design. The 1804 "Spiked Chin" was caused when a foreign object was impressed into the obverse die, creating a spear-like projection from Liberty's chin. Other varieties of 1804 are: a Plain 4 (no crosslet) or a Crosslet 4, and with or without stems on the reverse. 1805 and 1806 half cents are found in some combination of Small and Large final digits in the date and/or with or without stems. The 1808/7 is the other overdate of this type. As with most early U.S. coins, high grade examples of Draped Bust half cents are hard to find. Full Red Uncirculated examples are extremely rare and, for most dates, simply don't exist.

The key dates of Classic Head half cents are 1831 and 1836. The 1831 has a stated mintage of 2,200 pieces, but experts disagree over whether any were made for circulation or if all known examples started out as Proofs. 1809 half cents include interesting varieties such as "9 over inverted 9" (previously called 1809/6) and "Circle inside 0". The year 1811 features Wide and Close dates, plus an unofficial restrike that combines an obverse of 1811 with a reverse from the Draped Bust type. In 1828, mint engravers forgot to add the correct number of stars to one obverse die, resulting in the "12 Stars" variety.

Some information on this page is courtesy of PCGSCoinfacts.com.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Half Cents in different grades and condition. Our selection includes the 1804 Spiked Chin variety, the 1806 Draped Bust half cent with Small 6, and other popular examples. All half cents we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! Check out our online selection at http://www.executivecoin.com/

Thursday, March 29, 2012

Standing Liberty Quarters (1916 - 1930)


The Standing Liberty Quarter was designed by Hermon A. MacNeil in 1916 and his initial M appears to the right of the date. The first design portrayed Liberty with an exposed breast, which was redesigned in 1917. Instead of covering Liberty's breast with the same flowing material of the rest of her dress, the designer clothed her in a coat of chain mail. The left arm of Liberty uncovers a shield as symbol of protection. Her right hand bears an olive branch as symbol of peace. The reverse design was changed in 1917 also: the eagle was moved more to the center of the coin and three of the thirteen stars were placed beneath the eagle. Beginning in 1925, the dates on the coins were recessed, giving them more protection from wear. No Proof coins of this type were officially issued, but well-struck examples exist and they are the most sought out among collectors. Much attention is focused on Liberty's head for the so-called "Full Head" examples with complete details of hair and leaves above ear and full facial features. These quarters bring considerable premiums over poorly struck examples. Collectors also focus their attention on the rivets on the shield. Any coin with a Full Head and full rivets is a true prize. Mintmarks of this type ("D" for Denver or "S" for San Francisco) appear on the obverse just to the left of and above the date.

The 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter had a lot of success among the public, but it also raised many arguments on the grounds of alleged obscenity portraying Liberty. That's why MacNeil asked the Treasury to let him modify the design. The Treasury agreed and assigned Charles E. Barber to chance the coin. Thus, with this opportunity, Barber increased the concavity of the fields, covered Liberty's breast and repositioned the eagle higher in the reverse field. He also re-spaced the inscriptions and placed three of the 13 stars below the eagle, even though MacNeil clearly stated that the dies were untrue to his original conception.

Another change to the Standing Liberty Quarter design came in 1924. After years of noticing that the date would wear too fast on the coins due to Barber's changes, the Mint finally decided to do something about the wear problem. Therefore, from January 1925 until the end of the series, dates are in recess, protected from wear.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in the United States who offers a variety of Standing Liberty Quarters in different grades: circulated, uncirculated, certified and graded by PCGS, NGC and ANACS. Our wide selection includes the 1916 key date Standing Liberty Quarter, the 1917-D and 1917-S Type 1 Standing Liberty Quarter, the 1917-P and 1917-S Type 2 Standing Liberty Quarter, and other rare examples. Check out our inventory below.

Monday, March 26, 2012

Lincoln Cents (1909 - present)

The Lincoln Cent was designed by Victor D. Brenner in order to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth. The designer’s initials (V.D.B.) appeared near the bottom of the coin on the reverse of a limited number of coins from 1909. That’s why 1909 is considered a key date. In 1918, the initials were restored to the obverse side. The Lincoln type was the first cent to have the motto “IN GOD WE TRUST.” Also, no other American coin design comes close to the 100-year life span of the Lincoln Cent. For its reverse, two simple wheat heads in memorial style were approved. Between the two wheat heads, the national motto “E Pluribus Unum” (One out of Many) stands bold along with the denomination. On the obverse, curving around the upper rim is the motto  “In God We Trust” placed above Abraham Lincoln's portrait. Lincoln Cents were issued with a Wheat Ear reverse from 1909 to 1958. From 1959 till present, we have the Lincoln Memorial Cent. As 2009 is the 200th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth, the Mint released the new Lincoln Cent. Composition: .950 copper and .050 tin and zinc.

The history of the Lincoln Cent is much more complex than the result of the creativity of designer Victor D. Brenner. Under President Theodore Roosevelt’s command, the great artist Augustus Saint-Gaudens prepared designs for the new small cent featuring a flying eagle motif on obverse. Instead of the eagle though, Saint-Gaudens and Roosevelt favored a design with a head of Victory in profile wearing an Indian headdress. They liked this design so much that they decided to place it on the 1907 $10 instead. After Saint-Gaudens’ death, Brenner became in charge of the design of the rare cent and Lincoln was chosen as the perfect authentic subject for the wheat cent.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Lincoln Cents for sale, expertly photographed and pictured for your view! Our Lincoln cents selection includes: the ever popular keydate 1909-S VDB Lincoln Cent, the 1914-D Lincoln Cent key date, as well as Lincoln wheat pennies for sale from the 1910’s, 1920’s, 1930’s, and 1940’s in different grades including PCGS and NGC certified and graded. Be sure to check out our Lincoln cents for sale and the Lincoln cents Proof Rolls available on our official website!

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Shield Nickels (1866 - 1883)

The Shield Nickel was made possible by the Act of May 16, 1866 and replaces the 5-cent notes. The new five cent coin was designed by Longacre. It is made of 25% nickel and 75% copper. This created the unusual situation where two coins of the same value circulated simultaneously - the Shield nickel and Half dime.  In order to promote the new coin, and also because of the availability of nickel and copper compared to the higher cost of silver for Half Dimes, a huge quantity of nearly 15 million new nickels was produced in the 1st year.

The design of the Shield nickel was similar to that of the Two-cent coin. On the obverse, Longacre placed a shield, with the motto IN GOD WE TRUST above. The date was below. On the reverse, the number "5" for denomination was surrounded by 13 stars and 13 rays. Around the rim, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and CENTS were inscripted. Since the rays between the stars impaired the coins' striking quality, the rays were eliminated later in 1867 creating two varieties: With Rays and No Rays. Striking problems persisted, resulting in a series of coins noted for inconsistent strikes and lots of die cracks.

Besides being interested in the two varieties of 1866 and 1867, the Shield Nickel collector will definitely look for the 1867 Proof nickel With Rays which is excessively rare. Also, other sought out and expensive examples are the Proof-only 1877 and 1878 shield nickels. Another favorite with collectors is the 1880 nickel for its low mintage. Interesting varieties include a widely repunched date in 1866, the Open and Close 3's of 1873, 1879/8, and 1883/2.

Even though the Shield Nickel is popular among coin collectors being the first 5-cent coin approved for circulation, according to Breen's "Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins," the nickel was welcomed with a lot of criticism in 1866. The shield design was actually the choice of Mint Director James Pollock. This design was ridiculed as "the ugliest of all known coins" and the coin's obverse was called "a tombstone surmounted by a cross overhung by weeping willows." Furthermore, bigots criticized the rays between stars, often referring them as "stars and bars" placed there by treasonous people in the Mint who had chosen to honor the Southern rebels.

Buy Shield Nickels from The Executive Coin Company, one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Shield nickels in different grades and condition. Our selection includes the 1867 With Rays and the 1867 No rays, the 1881 key date, and other high grade shield nickels. All nickels we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! Check out our online selection below.

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Morgan Dollars (1878 - 1921)

The Morgan Silver Dollar is one of the most widely collected and popular American silver coins ever produced. Designed by George T. Morgan in 1878, the Morgan dollar featured a left-facing portrait of Liberty on the obverse and an eagle above a wreath, on the reverse. Designer's initial M is found on both sides of the coin – at the truncation of Liberty’s neck and on the ribbon’s left loop. The last year of production for the Morgan silver dollar was 1904, when over 350 million were melted under the Pittman Act of 1918 since their demand was low and bullion supply was exhausted. However, in 1921, the Morgan dollar was reintroduced for 1 year. This last time, its design had a flat-breasted eagle. Over a 28 year period, over 600 million silver Morgan dollars were produced in 96 different date and mint combinations. Even though 1921 was the end of an era for the silver Morgan Dollar, it was just the beginning of the road for coin collectors. Besides value and availability, the Morgan dollars have been popular for their attractive luster, their frosted surfaces and their deep mirror proof-like reflective surfaces. The deep mirror of cameo Morgan Dollar is the most prized and sought after silver dollar.

In 1878, the Bland-Allison Act authorized the production of the Morgan dollar as a way to reduce the oversupply of silver existent in America. Since then, Morgan dollars were minted in five different locations: Philadelphia (no mint mark), New Orleans (O), San Francisco (S), Denver (D) and Carson City (CC). Mintmarks can be found below the wreath, on the reverse.

When talking about Morgan dollars, we need to mention their specific niches known all over the world among coin collectors. The first struck Morgan exhibited eight tail feathers (8TF) on the reverse, and the eagle had a concave or “flat” breast. Still in 1878, at the order of Mint Director Henry Linderman, the Morgan dollars were struck with 7 tail feathers over the 8 tail feathers, creating the popular and scarce 7 over 8 tail feathers (7/8TF). In June of 1878, the convex or round breast on the reverse was introduced, and it remained the specific design for Morgan silver dollars until 1904. However, the 1921 Morgan dollar had a flat-breasted eagle.

Buy Morgan Dollars online from The Executive Coin Company, one of the top coin dealers in United States. We offer a wide variety of Morgan Silver Dollars for sale in different grades: circulated, uncirculated, certified and graded by PCGS, NGC, and ANACS! Our expertly photographed silver dollar selection includes the ever popular Carson City dollars, 1878 through 1885, 1891, 1892, 1893, and the sought out key dates: 1889-CC Morgan Dollar, 1893-CC, 1894, 1895-S, and 1895-O. Our inventory includes Morgan Dollars for sale in all popular dates. We also feature TOP 100 VAM varieties such as: the 1880-P VAM 1a Knobbed 8, the 1888-O VAM 4 Hotlips, the 1882-O/S VAM Over-Mintmark, the 1900-O VAM 29a Die Break through Date, and the 1900-O/CC VAM. We strive to provide competitive prices and excellent value on every Morgan Dollar you purchase.

Monday, March 12, 2012

Large Cents: They Just Don't Make Copper As Big As They Used To

Cents and half cents were the first coins struck for circulation under the United States government. Coinage of Large Cents began in 1793 and its laws stated that all cents had to weigh exactly twice as much as the Half Cent. All Large cents were minted only at the Philadelphia Mint. Proofs of Large Cents were made only in 1817 and all Proofs are extremely rare cents. The first Large cent and one of the first American coins struck at the U.S. mint was the Flowing Hair cent (1793). Then the Liberty Cap large cent design followed (1793-1796) to please the people who had objections that the earlier design was not a fair representation of Liberty. The first cents of this type had beaded borders (like the Flowing Hair Large cents), while following Liberty Cap cents had denticled border. The 1794 Starred Reverse is a unique variety that has 94 tiny stars placed among the denticles on the reverse. In 1796, the Liberty Cap design was replaced with the Draped Bust Large cent (1796-1807) designed by Robert Scot, featuring a better-looking Miss Liberty wearing a ribbon in her hair. This type underwent numerous changes and errors in its design including small dates, large dates, small fraction, large fraction, broken dies, restrikes, overdates and other errors. 1799 is the rarest date of this series and 1807/6 Large cent is another rare variety. The Classic Head cent (1808-1814) followed with cents that wore not struck as well as before. That's why coin collectors find it hard to get dates in choice condition. Due to a fire at the Mint, no cent was struck in 1815. In 1816, the Classic Head design was replaced with a new Liberty head design - the Coronet or Matron head and later the Braided Hair (1816-1857). 1816 is the year when the date was placed in the middle at the bottom of the obverse for the first time on a Large cent. 1816 is also a popular 1st year of issue for this type.

The first Large cent - "Flowing Hair" cent - had Liberty facing right on the obverse, surrounded by the word LIBERTY at the top and the date at the bottom. Also, a three-leaf sprig appears above the date, later changed to a strawberry leaf. There were two types of reverse - the Chain reverse and the Wreath reverse. This wreath had only one bow at the bottom. Regarding "Liberty Cap" cents, besides the 1794 Starred Reverse variety, there's the popular so-called Jefferson Head variety (1795) thought to have been made as a sample for a proposed contract with a private contractor. Later in 1795, the Mint reduced the weight of the Large cent, a change that lead to another modification - the replacement of the reeded edge with a plain one.

For the next cent design, the "Draped Bust", the most significant feature is its reverse which displayed three different designs: 1st reverse - double leaf at the top right, the 2nd reverse - single leaf on the olive branch, and the 3rd - double leaf. Also, in 1796 there was an error with LIHERTY on the obverse instead of LIBERTY. There's also the first overdate dating 1798 with 1798 over 7. In 1801, there were 3 errors on the reverse with the fraction displaying 1/000 instead of 1/100, a wreath with only one stem, and the U in United minted as II.

The "Classic Head" design portrayed Miss Liberty on the obverse, wearing a headband with the word LIBERTY on it. This is the first coin that displayed the 13 stars surrounding Liberty, symbolizing the 13 U.S. colonies. The "Liberty Head" has two main type: the Matron or Coronet Head (1816-1836) and the Braided Hair (1836-1857). The name of the first type comes from the headband on Liberty's head that looks like a crown. This type comes with an interesting variety of 1817 with 15 stars on the obverse instead of the usual 13. There are other varieties with small date or large date and overdates. There's another variety dating 1828 with Block 8 or Script 8. The 1821 Large cent is the rarest of this series. As the name suggests, the Braided Hair cents had Liberty wearing her hair braided. the most desired Braided Hair large cents are the ones with full red surfaces. No large cents were minted after 1857 because there were too expensive to make. The half cent was abandoned and the Small Cent was introduced.

View our Large Cent inventory at http://executivecoin.com/c-24-large-cents.aspx



Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Mercury Dime (1916 - 1945)

1919 Mercury Dime
Although this type of dime is commonly called Mercury Dime, it is also known as the Winged Liberty Head dime because of its obverse depicting a representation of Liberty with wings crowing her cap. The wings symbolize liberty of thought. However, the Mercury Head dime resembles a lot the Roman god Mercury and this is where its name comes from. Issued around the time of USA's impending entry into WWI, the Mercury dime carries a lot of symbols in its design. Still influenced by the Roman culture, the designer A.A. Weinman placed an ax covered by sticks tied together with rods, on the reverse. According to the "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins," the ax or "fasces" represented the expression "the power of life and death." In ancient Roman law this expression meant having the power to kill mercifully by the blade or mercilessly by the rods. Weinman's symbolic message was aimed towards the enemies of liberty and was also describing the country's military preparedness. An olive branch was placed around the ax symbolizing the country's willingness of peace. The designer's initials AW are placed to the right of Liberty's neck.


The Mercury Head Dime variety is one of the most popular among coin collectors. Besides the key dates and overdates, most dates can be obtained without much difficulty. However, the most popular dimes are those with Full Split Bands on the reverse, which means all of the bands that hold together the sticks on the ax must be visible and completely separated. Also, many dates are very rare in Gem condition with Full Split Bands. 


The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Mercury Head Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes high grade and certified Mercury dimes as well as key dates such as the 1916-D dime and the 1921-P dime. We also offer Mercury dimes with Full Split Bands and also the popular 1942/1 and 1942/1 D overdates. All dimes we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection!

Friday, February 24, 2012

Walking Liberty Half Dollars

Designed by Adolph A Weinman, the Walking Liberty Half Dollar was put into service in 1916. Weinman’s masterpiece depicts Miss Liberty "walking" toward the rising sun on obverse and an imposing eagle standing majestically on a mountain cliff on reverse. Weinman’s initials (AW) are placed under the eagle’s tail feathers. In 1916 and beginning of 1917, the mint marks "D" and "S" of Denver and San Francisco were placed on the obverse below the motto. However, in 1917, their location was moved to the reverse, on the lower left side. At the Philadelphia Mint, the coins were struck without any mint mark. A number of key dates are sought out by collectors: 1916, 1916-S, 1917-D Obverse, 1917-S Obverse, 1919, 1921, 1921-D, 1921-S, 1938-D and 1942-D/S. Collectors also look for Walking Liberty Half Dollars in mint state and proof. A very few walkers were struck with satin-finish and brilliant proof looks.

View our large inventory of Walking Liberty Half Dollars at http://executivecoin.com/c-87-walking-liberty.aspx