Monday, April 30, 2012

Trade Dollar (1873 - 1885)


The Trade Dollar was designed by William Barber in 1873 and it was issued for circulation in the Orient to compete with other dollar-sized coins of other countries. It was intended for export only. In the United States though, they circulated as legal tenders until 1876 when the Congress withdrew them. Many pieces that circulated overseas were counterstamped with Oriental characters, known as chop marks. The production of dollars continued until 1878, and after that only tokens were issued for proof sets until 1885. IN 1887, the Treasury redeemed all Trade dollars that were not mutilated. On the obverse, the Trade dollars depicts Miss Liberty facing left and looking towards the seashore, sitting on a cotton bale and holding an olive branch in her right hand. To her back stands a sheaf of wheat. In her left hand, Liberty is holding a ribbon or scroll with the word LIBERTY on it. The motto IN GOD WE TRUST is placed toward the bottom of the obverse, just above the date. Liberty is surrounded by 13 stars. On the reverse, a majestic eagle is holding an olive branch and arrows in its claws. E PLURIBUS UNUM is above on a ribbon, while the inscription 420 GRAINS, 900 FINE is below, just above the denomination. The mintmark is located on the reverse above the D in DOLLAR. The rarest of Trade Dollars are those dated 1884 and 1885. Issued only as Proofs and in small quantities, the existence of these coins was not revealed until 1908. However, all Trade Dollars are considered rare in high grades and the ones available are usually at high premiums.

Along the years of production, the Trade Dollar underwent some changes definitely worth mentioning. For the obverse, Trade dollars of 1873 through 1876 had the scroll point with LIBERTY ending to the left and Liberty's extended hand displaying only three fingers. Then, from 1876 till 1885, the scroll point ended downward and Liberty's extended hand showed four fingers. For the reverse, from 1873 until 1874 and occasionally in 1875 and 1876, there was a berry under the eagle's left talon and one of the arrowheads ended over 0. Then, occasionally on coins dating 1875 and 1876 and on all coins from 1877 until 1885, the reverse had no extra berry under the eagle's talon and one of the arrowheads ended over 2.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Trade Dollars in different grades and condition, certified and graded by PCGS. Our selection includes early date dollars with or without chop marks. All Trade dollars we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, April 27, 2012

Jefferson Nickel (1938 - present)


The Jefferson Nickel was designed by Felix Schlag, whose creative design displaying the portrait of Thomas Jefferson on the obverse and a corner view of Jefferson’s home, Monticello, on the reverse won him an award of $1,000. The new nickels were first issued in 1938 and showed president Jefferson's bust facing left on the obverse and the front view of Monticello on the reverse. On the obverse the inscriptions were placed differently than on earlier U.S. coins - The motto IN GOD WE TRUST was placed around the left rim, while LIBERTY and the date was around the right rim. On the reverse, E PLURIBUS UNUM stood around the top rim, while the MONTICELLO, FIVE CENTS and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA were inscribed below the building.

Along the years of production, the Jefferson nickel underwent some changes, mostly in the details of Jefferson's hair and ribbon. However, collectors pay more attention to the reverse when it comes to details, especially looking at the steps of Monticello. "Full Steps" nickels command pretty high premiums. Beginning of 1942 until 1945, some Jefferson nickels were made of a different metallic composition and are known as "Wartime Silver Alloy" nickels - 35% silver, 56% copper, and 9% manganese. This change in composition was necessary during the war since nickel was a critical war material needed. A larger mintmark was placed above the dome of Monticello to distinguish them from regular nickels.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Jefferson Nickels in different grades and condition, certified and graded by PCGS. Our selection includes the 1939-D key date Jefferson nickel as well as Wartime Silver Alloy nickels. We also offer high grade nickels with Almost Full Steps and Jefferson Nickel Proof Rolls. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection at www.executivecoin.com

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Half Dimes (1794 - 1873)


The Half Dime was one of the first denominations introduced in the United States. After the Act of April 2, 1972 that authorized the issuance of silver 5 cents, the first Half Dimes were struck only in 1794 even thought the half dimes were in the making process since 1792. The first half dime introduced for circulating was the Flowing Hair (Bust) Half Dime, designed by Robert Scot. This design was used on all silver denominations of the time in an attempt to standardize their appearance. The concept of almost identical designs for coins with identical metal composition was used all through 19th century on circulation American coins. The 1802 Draped Bust, Heraldic Eagle half dime is one of the classic rarities in the U.S. coinage series and only very few pieces are known to exist. Proof coins began to be struck in 1860 at the Philadelphia Mint. Half dimes from 1863 to 1870 are all very rare to find.

The Flowing Hair Half Dime (1794 - 1795) displayed on the obverse a portrait of Liberty with flowing hair and facing right, surrounded by 15 stars. On the reverse, an eagle was perched on a cloud, surrounded by an olive branch and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. It seemed that this first design raised a lot of criticism from the people, who thought the representation of Liberty was horrible and the eagle looked more like a malnourished turkey. In 1796, this design was replaced by Scot's Draped Bust Half Dime, a type that had a Small Eagle Reverse in 1796 and 1797, similar to the eagle on the previous Bust design, and a Heraldic Eagle Reverse from 1800 to 1805. The Heraldic Eagle design displayed the Great Seal of the United States on the reverse, known also to collectors as the Large Eagle. In 1805, the production of Half Dimes ceased until 1829. The denomination appears for the first time on half dimes in 1829 on the reverse, when the Mint issued the Capped Bust half dime, a design that lasted until 1837. This time, Liberty was facing left and was surrounded by 13 stars instead of 15. The reverse had a majestic eagle holding an olive branch in its right claw and arrows in its left claw. The motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was introduced too, placed on a ribbon above the eagle.

In 1837, a new design was introduced for the half dime - the Seated Liberty designed by Christian Gobrecht. A design that appeared first on silver dollars in 1836, it displayed Miss Liberty sitting on a rock and with a shield in front of her. In her right hand, Liberty was holding a scroll - or others would say a ribbon - with LIBERTY on it. With her left hand, Liberty was holding a pole with a liberty cap on top. The reoccurring theme of Liberty surrounded by 13 stars is present as well. For the reverse, Gobrecht put the denomination HALF DIME in the middle, surrounded by an olive branch with a bow. This design underwent numerous changes along the years, many of them recorded as Varieties. The first Variety with No Stars on obverse was minted in 1837-1838. In 1838 through 1853, the Variety 2 with Stars on obverse was minted for circulation - 13 stars were added and surrounded Liberty. Starting 1838, Seated Liberty half dimes were minted at the New Orleans mint also, showing an O for the mintmark located above the bow on the reverse. The 1838-O Seated Half Dime is more easily available in low grades and far more rare in higher grades.

Within Variety 2, the half dimes were minted some with No Drapery from Elbow (1837-1840) and others With Drapery from Elbow (1840 on). In 1840, although initially guided to make some improvements in the Seated Liberty design, Robert Ball Hughes made some big changes on Liberty - he fattened her arms and body, enlarged her head, flattened her bosom, changed her decollete, chipped away much of the rock she sat on, moved her shield to an upright position, and changed her clothing, also adding extra drapery. This design appeared first on dollars, quarters and dimes. Even though these "improvements" were supposed to improve the striking quality and design, it seems that it actually weakened the strike in all denominations from 1840 till 1858. "Full Head" coins are very rare or unknown of for this period.

After the gold rush in California and the rise in price of silver, the third Variety for Half Dimes emerged with Arrows at the Date (1853-1855) to denote the reduction of weight under the laws of the Act of February, 1853. Arrows at date were also placed on dimes, quarters and halves during that period. Variety 3 half dimes were minted at Philadelphia, New Orleans and San Francisco mints. Since all half dimes from this period were given to circulation, there are very few in high grade. In 1860, the Seated Liberty design was changed again when mint designer James Longacre switched the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA from the reverse to the obverse, and placed a "Cereal Wreath" on the reverse, around the denomination.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Half Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date half dimes like the 1796 Draped Bust Half dime and other early 1800s half dimes in high grades. We also offer half dime in different varieties like the No Stars Liberty Seated half dime and Seated half dimes With Stars, as well as Half Dimes with No Drapery, Arrows at Date, Obverse Stars and Legend on the obverse. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, April 20, 2012


The Franklin Half Dollar was designed in 1947 by John R. Sinnock, only a few weeks before his death. His initials appear below Franklin's shoulder. The coin depicts the portrait of Benjamin Franklin on the obverse, enclosed by LIBERTY at the top and the motto IN GOD WE TRUST at the bottom. On the reverse, Sinnock placed the Liberty bell, with an eagle on its right and E PLURIBUS UNUM at its left. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is above, while the denomination is below.

Even before the Franklin coin reached circulation, the design was criticized by many. Some thought the coin was too plain compared to the Walking Liberty Half Dollar. Others had objections regarding the eagle being too small and having low relief. The latter concern was solved later when Proofs of 1959-1963 showed off a new reverse hub with the eagle in higher relief and only three feathers instead of four. Still other people had concerns about the plain crack in the bell which could've brought derogatory remarks to the United States coinage. And then there were the bigots, who misinterpreted Sinnock initials J.S. placed on the coin as designating Joseph Stalin and therefore communism.

Franklin Half Dollars have emerged with popularity in the recent years. Although the collector can fill out his collection with all kinds of different grades including brilliant Uncirculated, full strike Uncirculated pieces with full bell lines on the reverse and other details are much harder to find. Proofs were minted from 1950 through 1963, some with satin finish and others as brilliant proofs.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Franklin half dollars in different grades and condition. Our selection includes high grade Franklin halves with great toning or cameo devices as well as Proofs and the 1949-S Franklin Half key date. We also offer Franklin Half Dollar Silver Proof Rolls. All Franklin halves we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! Check out our online selection below.

Monday, April 16, 2012

Washington Quarter (1932 - present)


1939 Washington Quarter
The Washington Quarter was issued at the 200th anniversary of George Washington's birth in order to commemorate the 1st United States president. After high competition for the design, the new quarter was designed by John Flanagan, a New York sculptor. His initials can be found at the base of Washington's neck. As the Treasury required, the president's portrait had to be based on Houdon's bust (1785) preserved at Mount Vernon. Therefore, the obverse shows the head of George Washington, facing left. LIBERTY is above, IN GOD WE TRUST to the left, and the date below. On the reverse, Flanagan placed an eagle perched on a branch, a wreath below it, and E PLURIBUS UNUM above. Around the reverse rim, UNITED STATES ON AMERICA and QUARTER DOLLAR were inscribed. The mintmark is located on the reverse, below the wreath. Only after the first quarters of this type went into circulation, the Commission had strong objections regarding the design. It seems that the motto IN GOD WE TRUST was too light and wore easily, and so did the details on Washington hair and face. For this reason, quarter from 1932-1934 are harder to find in good condition and with strong details on obverse. During 1934, two hub changes were made, producing medium and heavy motto types for the Philadelphia and Denver quarters. Quarters of 1935 have medium motto, while the ones dating 1936-1964 have heavy motto. The Washington quarter was minted in silver until 1964, when it was replaced with a new alloy.

Besides the modifications to the motto, other changes affected the Washington quarter along the years. In 1938, the president's profile was sharpened. In 1944, the shape of Washington's hair and ribbon were changed. Although there are no real rarities of Washington quarters, the collector of this type will definitely look for the 1932-S key date, available at a higher price than the rest of the quarters. The good thing about collecting Washington quarters is that the collector can fulfill his collection at a reasonable price. Later dates are available at low costs in any condition. The collector also has the option to seek out Washington quarters in high grades, at a good price, and with an array of superb toning or bright white with full luster. Proofs are available for the years 1936 through 1942 and 1950 through 1964.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Washington Quarters in different grades and condition, certified and graded by NGC and PCGS. Our selection includes the 1932-S key date Washington quarter as well as early date quarters in high grades. We offer beautifully toned quarters, bright white examples, and quarters with full luster. You can also browse through our Proof selection of Washington Quarters and the Quarter Proof Rolls. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Friday, April 13, 2012

Bust Dimes (1796 - 1837)


1829 capped bust dime
The first dime introduced for circulation was the Draped Bust Dime with Small Eagle Reverse in 1796. The design of Early Bust Dimes coincides with the Bust Half Dimes. The 1796 Draped Bust features 13 obverse stars, while the 1797 dimes have 13 or 16 obverse stars. Just like the half dimes, early dimes have no denomination present on the reverse until 1809, when the denomination first appeared on the Capped Bust design. The Draped Bust, Heraldic Eagle dimes are usually found in low grades; high grades early dimes are rare.

Robert Scot's Draped Bust design appeared in 1796 on dimes, a type that had a Small Eagle Reverse for 1796-1797 and a Heraldic Eagle Reverse for 1798-1807. Examples of Draped Bust dimes with Small Eagle Reverse are very rare especially in high grades. The Heraldic Eagle design displayed the Great Seal of the United States on the reverse, known also to collectors as the Large Eagle. This eagle had a shield on its breast and holding in its beak a ribbon with E PLURIBUS UNUM inscribed on it. The eagle was holding arrows and an olive branch in its claws. The obverse depicted Liberty with flowing hair, a ribbon behind her head, and drapery covering her neckline. LIBERTY was placed above and the date below.The denomination - 10 C. - appears for the first time on dimes in 1809 on the reverse, when the Mint issued the Capped Bust dimes, a design that lasted until 1837. This time, Liberty was facing left and was surrounded by 13 stars. Similar to the half dollar design, Liberty had her hair tucked in a cap secured by a headband with the word LIBERTY on it. The reverse had a majestic eagle perched on a branch and holding arrows in its left claw. This time, the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM was placed on a ribbon above the eagle and not in its beak like on earlier dimes.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a wide variety of Bust Dimes in different grades and condition. Our selection includes early date dimes like the 1805 Draped Bust dime and other early 1800s dimes in high grades. All coins we display are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your unique collection! Check out our online selection below.

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Peace Dollar (1921 - 1935)


Initially a commemorative coin to honor the peace of World War I, the Peace Dollar was designed by Anthony de Francisci in 1921. His monogram is located in the coin's field under the neck of Liberty. On the obverse, the Peace dollar depicts Miss Liberty facing left, wearing a crown similar to that seen on the Statue of Liberty. LIBERTY is above, while IN GOD WE TRUST and the date are below. The reverse portrays an eagle standing bold atop of a mountain peak, along with a laurel branch and PEACE inscribed below. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and E PLURIBUS UNUM are above, while ONE DOLLAR is to be seen just below the center. Rays of an unseen sun emanate from the lower right.

The existence of the Peace dollar is credited to Farran Zerbe, a coin collector with enough political influence to get the approval on releasing a coin to commemorate the peace of World War I. Zerbe was also a late historian of the American Numismatic Association. The Peace Dollar was put into circulation in January 1922, even though over 1 million pieces had been struck in December 1921. Issues of 1921, and a few pieces dated 1922, were in high relief. It was found that the high relief caused problems in having the pieces strike up properly, so in 1922 the motifs were redone to a shallower format. The rare Matte and Satin Finish Proofs of 1922 are of both the high-relief style of 1921 and the normal or shallow relief style.

Mintage of Peace silver dollars was continuous from 1921 through 1928 and again in 1934 and 1935. In 1964, the Denver Mint struck 316,076 Peace Dollars but, before they were released into circulation, all of the coins were destroyed. A few may have been purchased or "taken" by Mint employees and rumors persist of this coin's existence. However, for fear of confiscation by Treasury officials, none have yet appeared on the market. Were it legal to own, the 1964-D Peace Dollar would become one of the most valuable of all United States coins.

When it comes to collecting Peace dollars, the 1928-P is a key date, commanding a good price even in well-circulated grades. Most of the San Francisco issues are tough in uncirculated grades, particularly the 1927-S and 1928-S as well as the 1924-S and 1934-S.

The Executive Coin Company offers a wide selection of Peace Dollars including the rare key date 1921 Peace Dollar. Our selection consists of Peace Dollars uncertified or certified by PCGS, NGC and ANACS. We offer high grade Peace Dollars including certified MS67, 1928-P key date peace dollars and the sought out 1934-S. If you're looking for an original peace dollar with Superb Eye Appeal, Full Luster and Strike, Blast White surfaces, Original Skin, or Toning, we have it. Please check out our inventory below. We are confident you will find a Peace Dollar perfect for your unique collection.

Friday, April 6, 2012

Buffalo Nickels (1913 - 1938)


1935 Buffalo Nickel
The Buffalo Nickel is distinctive in its own way, considered by collectors a truly unique American work of art. The coin portrays the American Indian on the obverse and the Buffalo or Bison on the reverse. Its designer, James E. Fraser, accurately portrayed the male Native American on the obverse and an American buffalo on the reverse by using three different Indians and a real bison from New York Central Park Zoo as models. His initial “F” is placed beneath the date. The 1st Year of Issue featured two distinct varieties: the 1913 Type 1 Buffalo Nickel had the bison on a mound, while the 1913 Type 2 Buffalo had a redesigned base with a thinner, straight line. Over 1.2 billion Buffalo nickels were minted from 1913 to 1938 at three mints: Philadelphia (no mintmark), San Francisco (S) and Denver (D). The mintmarks can be found on the reverse under the denomination. Matte Proof coins were made for collectors from 1913 to 1916. Proof Buffalo nickels began to be issued again in 1936. The 1937-D three-legged Buffalo nickel is another sought out 5 cent. The three-legged characteristic is the result of excessive regrinding of a die to remove clash marks.

Here's how the Buffalo Nickel came to existence. Early in 1911, aware of the law stipulating a coin design could be changed only as often as every 25 years, Treasury Secretary Franklin MacVeagh's son informed his father about the one-in-a-lifetime opportunity to release the new design on the five-cent piece. Thus, MacVeagh decided to take the occasion and produce something as magnificent as the Saint-Gaudens double eagle. For this, he hired James Earle Fraser, a former assistant to Saint-Gaudens and an exquisite artist to design the new nickel.

For the design, Fraser employed three chiefs as models for the obverse: Iron Tail, Two Moons and Chief John Big Tree. This way, he wanted to accurately portray the male Native American. To be consistent with the American theme, Fraser illustrated an American bison on the reverse, old Black Diamond, then living in a New York City zoo. He placed the buffalo on a mound to show its strength and majesty. Secretary MacVeagh loved Fraser’s design which was medal-like and beautiful, and he immediately approved the design for the five-cent coin. Therefore, by mid February 1913, despite strong opposition from the Hobbs Company of New York - a vending-machine firm - coinage began at the Philadelphia mint.

The Buffalo nickel underwent some changes along the years. First, Chief engraver Charles E. Barber removed the mound on the reverse, since the words "FIVE CENTS" at the base of the reverse wore down too quickly in circulation. Instead, he drew a line and put the denomination under it. Thus, in 1913, two distinct varieties were struck. The 1913 Type 1 Buffalo had the denomination on a raised mound on the reverse, while the 1913 Type 2 Buffalo had it set under a line. Since the public saved the very first coins released, it's harder to find the 1913-S Type 2 and it commands a higher premium. Secondly, Charles E. Barber made some changes on the obverse in 1916, lowering the relief of the Indian head and strengthening several details such as the nose and the lettering of LIBERTY.

Coin collecting started to be popular around 1940s and continued in 1950s, since most collectors could fill their coin boards by searching through pocket change or bank rolls. At that time, the most popular coins to collect were the Lincoln Cent, the Buffalo Nickel and the Mercury Dime. The later years saw a stagnation or even downfall in collecting Buffaloes, as the coins were less available and collectors had to buy individual coins from dealers or search through bags sold at a premium.

Besides the two popular varieties of 1913, collectors like the 1918/17 overdate from the Denver mint, matte proof and proof nickels, and the popular 1937-D three-legged Buffalo Nickel. During the 1920s and the World War I impact, the demand for all coins decreased. Thus, no Buffalo Nickel was made in 1922, 1932 and 1933. By end of 1937, it was decided that the 1938 Buffalo Nickel should be struck only at Denver. At least three reverse dies already with S mintmark were then overpunched with a "D."

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Buffalo Nickels in different grades: circulated, uncirculated, certified and graded by PCGS and NGC. Our selection includes the popular 1913-P and 1913-S Type 1 buffalo, 1913 Type 2 buffalo, key dates and scarce dates nickels like the 1915-D and the 1924-S, the sought out 1937-D 3-legged Buffalo, and others. All coins we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection!

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Half Cents (1800 - 1857)


Half Cent
The Half Cent is the lowest face value coin struck by the United States. All half cents are scarce and its popularity has grown in the past years. All half cents were issued at the Philadelphia Mint. The Draped Bust design of Robert Scot first appeared on Large Cents in 1796, then appeared on Half Cents in 1800. The first coins of 1800, and all of 1802, were struck on cent stock: blanks rolled and cut down from misstruck cents. On the obverse, the Half Cent portrays Liberty facing right, with flowing hair and wearing a ribbon in her hair. The inscription LIBERTY is above, while is date is below. On the reverse, the denomination HALF CENT is surrounded by a wreath and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Half cents of 1809 sported a new look, with a matronly bust of Liberty facing left and a modified wreath on the reverse. The new design, by John Reich, lasted until 1836 and was called "Classic Head." Classic Head half cents were not minted from 1812-1824, in 1827 and 1830. This design featured Liberty with flowing hair and wearing a headband with the inscription LIBERTY. She was surrounded by 6 stars on the right and 7 on the left.
The Braided Hair Half Cent was designed in 1840 by Christian Gobrecht and had Miss Liberty facing left this time, wearing her hair braided and being surrounded by 13 stars. Her headband bearing the inscription LIBERTY looked more like a crown. The Braided Hair half cents boast some of the lowest mintages of any U.S. coin types. Some collectors, especially those who have an affinity for this denomination, believe they are among the best values, as well. Full Red examples are very scarce. 1852 Half Cents are known only in proof condition and the so-called "Originals" of this date are extremely rare. Most originals have large berries in the wreath on reverse, while most restrikes have small berries in the wreath.

Collecting Half Cents has grown in popularity in the past years. Fortunately for collectors, the inaugural year of the Draped Bust (1800) is a reasonably common date. The 1802, the first overdate of any half cent, is the rarest date of the type and includes one variety with a new reverse (scarce) and another with the old reverse of 1800 (extremely scarce). Collectors are also interested in the different varieties of the Draped Bust design. The 1804 "Spiked Chin" was caused when a foreign object was impressed into the obverse die, creating a spear-like projection from Liberty's chin. Other varieties of 1804 are: a Plain 4 (no crosslet) or a Crosslet 4, and with or without stems on the reverse. 1805 and 1806 half cents are found in some combination of Small and Large final digits in the date and/or with or without stems. The 1808/7 is the other overdate of this type. As with most early U.S. coins, high grade examples of Draped Bust half cents are hard to find. Full Red Uncirculated examples are extremely rare and, for most dates, simply don't exist.

The key dates of Classic Head half cents are 1831 and 1836. The 1831 has a stated mintage of 2,200 pieces, but experts disagree over whether any were made for circulation or if all known examples started out as Proofs. 1809 half cents include interesting varieties such as "9 over inverted 9" (previously called 1809/6) and "Circle inside 0". The year 1811 features Wide and Close dates, plus an unofficial restrike that combines an obverse of 1811 with a reverse from the Draped Bust type. In 1828, mint engravers forgot to add the correct number of stars to one obverse die, resulting in the "12 Stars" variety.

Some information on this page is courtesy of PCGSCoinfacts.com.

The Executive Coin Company is one of the top coin dealers in United States who offers a variety of Half Cents in different grades and condition. Our selection includes the 1804 Spiked Chin variety, the 1806 Draped Bust half cent with Small 6, and other popular examples. All half cents we offer are expertly photographed with great care and accuracy to help you make the best choice for your collection! Check out our online selection at http://www.executivecoin.com/